Know

This preview shows page 11 - 13 out of 26 pages.

What information, as it relates to what I'm writing, does the audience already  know? Is my audience more familiar or unfamiliar to me? Do I know them well? Do they  know me well? Is there anything about which I am writing that needs explanation? Will my audience expect me to be casual, friendly, familiar, or professional in my  writing? Familiarity With Your Audience In a classroom setting, you know your audience is your instructor and, often, your  classmates. In this case, you know your intended audience (your instructor and your  classmates), but your relationship with them is more formal and less familiar. As such,  you cannot assume what level of familiarity they can expect in your writing. Therefore, you should err on the side of formality any time your audience is unfamiliar  and/or when the level of formality they expect from you may be unknown. When you  write for a classroom assignment, you should always assume your instructor will expect  a level of formality—unless the assignment explicitly asks you to be informal— regardless of how well you might know him or her. It is, therefore, important to understand if your audience is: familiar and known:  a family member, a close friend, your partner or spouse unfamiliar and known:  an audience who has come to listen to you talk about a  shared interest (you share knowledge of the interest but do not known them  personally), your college instructor (you know your instructor and are familiar with her but you do not know what she knows and does not know about any given  topic), a new colleague, your boss, a distant relative, museum attendees
Theme: Communicating Historical Ideas unfamiliar and unknown:  your new classmates, a random group of people  listening to a public speech, blog readers Review Checkpoint To test your understanding of the content presented in this learning block,  please click on the Question icon below . Click your selected response to see  feedback displayed below it. If you have trouble answering, you are always free  to return to this or any learning block to re-read the material. 1. True or false: When considering the audience for your essay, you do not need  to think about how much background information they might have on your topic.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture