Hospitals who are held to higher standards Kelly McHugh Aiken 2012 they contest

Hospitals who are held to higher standards kelly

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Hospitals, who are held to higher standards (Kelly, McHugh, Aiken, 2012), they contest it should not negatively reflect their findings. The author also investigates past practices in relation to unnecessary placement of urinary catheters in the emergency department (Carter, Pallin, Mandel, Sinnette, & Schuur 2016) in order to identify the changing trends. Discussion of M e t h o d olo g y The author used a qualitative analysis from six emergency departments using conventional analysis of the information derived from 52 interviews including nine focus groups, 25 PAGE 8
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Task 1 Evidence-Based Practice and Applied Nursing Research of the 52 were nurse leaders and clinical nurses in the Emergency Department (Carter, Pallin, Mandel, Sinnette, & Schuur 2016). Focus groups took place when researcher were on site. Some of the interviews also took place on- site, while other were via telephone. The interviews and focus group meetings were audio-taped and were transcribed word-for word. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the information “in NVivo (QSR International Pty Ltd, version 9, 2010)” (Carter, Pallin, Mandel, Sinnette, & Schuur 2016). They also investigated ED’s that were utilizing criteria that defined and followed policies of necessity for urinary catheter placement, as well as tracking its effect on the reduction of UC insertions (Carter, Pallin, Mandel, Sinnette, & Schuur 2016). In order to ascertain what actions the nurse leaders performed that contributed to the inclusion and performance by the clinical nurses, the primary author all of the gathered information and reviewed the findings with the study authors so that an agreement was concluded to the validity of the collected data (Carter, Pallin, Mandel, Sinnette, & Schuur 2016). Data An aly s i s Interviews were implemented on ED nurses, nurse leaders, physicians, physician leaders, hospital leaders, infection prevention personnel, midlevel providers and ancillary staff. They looked at existing CAUTI prevention programs, who was responsible for implementing them, carrying them out, and what was being done to facilitate awareness and adherence to better outcomes. A research team put together summaries focusing on common themes among all of them. In validating their findings, their focus groups were the nurse leader’s in reference to what kind of programs, interventions, and tools used to tackle the CAUTI debacle. This is how they could validate their claims in order to provide reliability and credibility to their findings (Carter, Pallin, Mandel, Sinnette, & Schuur 2016). Researcher’s Conclusion The researchers found that nurse leaders play an integral part in implementing and sustaining CAUTI prevention programs. Their efforts have made an impact by educating staff on the present dangers and potential harm UC’s can be to patients, empowering nurses to be proactive, advocating working as a team with the physicians and having a questioning attitude with regards to the necessity of UC placement if they feel it does not meet current criteria.
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  • Winter '18
  • Qualitative Research, urinary tract infection, Urinary catheterization, urinary catheter, Applied Nursing Research, C361

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