Adverse effects of oxytocin are dose related and take two forms maternal and

Adverse effects of oxytocin are dose related and take

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 12 pages.

Adverse effects of oxytocin are dose related and take two forms —maternal and fetal. The most common maternal adverse effects are nausea, vomiting, uterine tachysystole, and cardiac arrhythmias. Less common but potentially fatal are severe water intoxication and hyponatremia. Question 17 1 out of 1 points A female patient is taking oral cyclophosphamide therapy for breast cancer. Because of possible adverse effects of the drug, the nurse will instruct the patient to do which of the following? Response Feedback: An adverse effect of this drug is the incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis. The nurse should encourage the patient to drink at least 2 liters of fluid a day and, in high-dose therapy, administer the uroprotectant agent mesna. Therapy should include prehydrating the patient orally and intravenously with at least 2 liters of normal saline solution. Potassium and magnesium additives may be indicated. The nurse will monitor urine output vigilantly to ensure an output of at least half of the intake. Taking the medication at bedtime and increasing protein in her diet are not associated with limiting the possible adverse effects of the drug. Question 18 1 out of 1 points A woman is receiving prolonged drug therapy during her complicated pregnancy, and it may pose a risk to both the mother and the fetus. The primary care physician has made dosage adjustments to minimize adverse effects and prevent toxicity. The nurse should make sure Response Feedback: If prolonged drug use is necessary and poses a risk to the woman or the fetus, the pregnant woman and the fetus need to be monitored for both therapeutic and adverse effects of drug therapy. Serum levels of the drug should be monitored to detect elevations that may lead to adverse effects and the need for dosage adjustments. The FDA would not need to be informed that the woman is receiving drug therapy. At this point, with the patient already taking the drug, it is not necessary to check the FDA category of the drug. The use of nonpharmacologic alternatives is a good idea but would not be as critical as monitoring drug levels. Question 19 1 out of 1 points
Image of page 5
A woman is receiving magnesium sulfate for intrapartum eclampsia. The patient is perspiring and her blood pressure is 88/50. The serum magnesium level is 10 mg/dL. The nurse will interpret these manifestations as Response Feedback: Maternal adverse effects from magnesium sulfate toxicity are sweating, hypotension, flaccid paralysis, hypothermia, and cardiac depression. A serum level of 10 to 12 mg/dL is associated with toxicity (normal levels without infusion of magnesium sulfate are 1.8–3 mg/dL). Common adverse effects include headache, hyporeflexia, weakness, thirst, flushing, and burning at the infusion site. These manifestations do not indicate hypersensitivity or idiosyncratic reactions.
Image of page 6
Image of page 7

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 12 pages?

  • Fall '13
  • Pharmacology, progesterone, Therapeutic effect, estrogen

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture