O see figure 119 in your textbook viscosity is the

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
flame dries their glassware before using for anhydrous chemical reactions. o See figure 11.9 in your textbook. - Viscosity : is the resistance to flow that is exhibited by all liquids and gases at a given temperature. o You can think of viscosity as the “thickness” of a liquid. o What happens to the viscosity as you increase or decrease the temperature?
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
o Motor oil is sold by viscosity: 10W40. 10 is the viscosity in the summer, 40 is the viscosity in the winter. 11.5 Intermolecular Forces (IMFs) - Very useful for explaining the properties of liquids, especially in biological systems. - The boiling point of a liquid (or the melting point of a solid) is a good measure of the IMF’s in a liquid. - - The stronger the IMF in a substance, the greater its Boiling Point or Melting Point will be. - Think of the IMFs as the ‘glue’ that makes molecules stick together. - The larger the molecule the more intermolecular interactions possible. - These are not actual chemical bonds where electrons are exchanged or shared. These IMFs arise from weak partial (+) and partial (–) interactions with polar atoms, polar bonds, or induced dipoles. 1. Dispersion Forces or London Forces : are the weakest of the IMF’s. o These forces arise from a temporary, uneven distribution of e-‘s around the nucleus of an atom. This uneven distribution creates an instantaneous (or induced) very small (weak) dipole. o See figure 11.22 in your textbook.
Image of page 2
o All substances have these forces. o They are the strongest (and only) IMF’s for non-polar covalent compounds .
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern