This genocide is consist with the definition of

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This genocide is consist with the definition of genocide…Genocide is “the deliberate and systematic destruction of a racial, ethnic, political, or cultural group.”(re-introduce) In a course of a hundred days in 1994, the Hutu government of Rwanda and its allies nearly succeeded in exterminating the country’s Tutsi minority. Hutu militia and citizens murdered as many as 800,000 Tutsi people, their aim being the extermination the Tutsi population. Yet some historians and officials claim the killings of the Tutsi people is not considered genocide, but rather a continuation of long-standing civil conflicts and civil war. Basic truths about the genocide have been denied and labeled as inaccurate. While there is disagreement about many aspects of Rwanda's 100 days, the central truth is not in doubt, the killings of the Tutsi in people is indeed genocide. The killings of the Tutsi’s in 1994 was centrally planned and administered by the Hutu government against the entire Tutsi population. Denial of the Rwandan genocide does not change historical facts.1)By examining the history of the Hutu-Tutsi relationship, one is able to better understand what caused the Rwandan genocide. The Hutu (Abahutu) people are said to be indigenous to regions presently known as Rwanda and Burundi. These areas were also inhabited by pygmy people known as the Twa (Batwa). The Tutsi (Watutsi) people migrated to Rwanda from southern Ethiopia in the 14th century and are said to be nonindigenous or alien. The Hutu people were
considered agriculturist, the Twa were hunter-gathers, and the Tutsi’s were pastoralist. The Tutsi’s settled among the Hutu’s and adopted their language, beliefs, and customs. The Tutsis established a small kingdom and monarchy in the 15th century; the Tutsi king “Mwami” ruled the region. Eventually, economic differences between the groups began to form. The alien Tutsis as pastoralist were often in a position of dominance; they used their ownership of cattle to achieve economic, political, and social control over the agricultural ingenious Hutu. Tutsis saw themselves as a higher class than the Hutu people- one race was subservient to the other. 2) 19th century Rwanda witnessed increased racial tensions between the Hutus and Tutsis when the Belgian colonist arrived in 1919 during World War1 and inherited the colony as part of the League of Nations mandate. The Belgian colonist found Tutsi’s to be more physically appealing than the Hutu’s; the Tutsi’s had lighter skin and were taller and slimmer in size. The Belgians believed the Tutsis were the “born rulers” of Rwanda and their goal was to turn the Tutsi into an elite. Therefore, the Tutsi received preferential treatment, education and leadership positions. A forced labor system known as Uburetwa became part of the tax system and was a forced imposition on the Hutu under Belgium control and made a clear separation between the elite Tutsi and the Hutu. “Tutsi privilege in colonial Rwanda set all Tutsis apart from the Hutus in their relations to power.”98 This magnified the divide between the Hutu and the Tutsi even more under Belgian colonization.

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