in the 1890s as a metaphor for a political revolution that would transform the

In the 1890s as a metaphor for a political revolution

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 6 pages.

in the 1890s as a metaphor for a political revolution that would transform the drab country into a land of color and unlimited prosperity. It was also used by editorial cartoonists of the 1890s to represent political upheaval. Alfred T. Mahan “The Influence of Sea Power Upon History” U.S. must have overseas military bases to become a world power Wade-Davis Bill Each state ruled by a military governor 50% of white males must take an oath of loyalty Oath of loyalty-never voluntarily supported the Confederacy New state government had to abolish slavery and repeal secession Disenfranchise most former Confederate officials, the bill was never passed 14th Amendment All persons born or naturalized in the United States are citizens of the U.S. citizens of the U.S. No State shall make any law which shall restrict the rights and privileges of U.S. citizens No state shall deny any person of right to life, liberty and property without due process of law Freedmen’s Bureau Helped aid the transition from slave to freed man, they funded schools, but were never fully funded Were prominent around the late 1800s Wanted balance/equality for African Americans In result these schools were burned down Compromise of 1877 The Compromise of 1877 was an informal, unwritten deal, that settled the intensely disputed 1876 U.S. presidential election. It resulted in the United States federal government pulling the last troops out of the South, and formally ending the Reconstruction Era. Lynching Lynching was an act of “punishment” toward mainly people of color From 1882-1938, the state with the highest lynching totals was Mississippi-42 Whites, 539 Blacks=581 in total W.E.B. DuBois Became the first African American to earn a phd from Harvard Sharecropping
Image of page 3
Tenant farmers pay rent with share of crop Created cycle of debt and legacy of poverty Jim Crow Laws 1890s laws that enforced racial segregation Supreme Court upheld in Plessy v. Ferguson decision (1896); “separate but equal” John D. Rockefeller Had an oil company named Standard Oil Gospel of Wealth A term created by Andrew Carnegie as a charge to other rich men, to do things that will better people who don't have what they have.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Fall '09
  • MRPETERALLANROODE
  • Plessy v. Ferguson, Native Americans in the United States, Federal government of the United States, Reconstruction era of the United States, Wounded Knee Massacre, The Gospel of Wealth

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture