Consider that the degree of congruence between the employees and the managers

Consider that the degree of congruence between the

This preview shows page 19 - 21 out of 30 pages.

Consider that the degree of congruence between the employee’s and the manager’s perception of the employee’s job influences the degree to which the manager will judge that employee effective. Therefore, be certain your employees fully understand their roles so you can accurately assess their performance. 2. In group situations where the norms support high output, you can expect markedly higher individual performance than when the norms restrict output. Group norms that support antisocial behavior increase the likelihood that individuals will engage in deviant workplace activities. 3. Pay attention to the organizational status levels of the employee groups you create. Because lower-status people tend to participate less in group discussions, groups with high status differences are likely to inhibit input from lower-status members and reduce their potential. 4. When forming employee groups, use larger groups for fact-finding activities and smaller groups for action-taking tasks. When creating larger groups, you should also provide measures of individual performance. To increase employee satisfaction, work on making certain your employees perceive their job roles the same way you perceive their roles. Section 3: Chapter Outline (linked with PowerPoint Presentation) Chapter 10 I. Why Have Teams Become So Popular? A. Decades ago, it made news because no one else was doing it. Today, it is the organization that does not use teams that has become newsworthy. B. The current popularity of teams seems based on the evidence that teams typically outperform individuals when the tasks being done require multiple skills, judgment, and experience. C. As organizations have restructured, they have turned to teams to better utilize employee talents.
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II. Differences Between Groups and Teams A. Groups and teams are not the same thing. (Exhibit 10-1, slide 10-5) B. In the last chapter, we defined a group as two or more individuals, interacting and interdependent, who have come together to achieve particular objectives. 1. A work group is a group that interacts primarily to share information and to make decisions to help each member perform within his or her area of responsibility. a. Work groups have no need or opportunity to engage in collective work that requires joint effort. Their performance is the summation of each group member’s individual contribution. b. There is no positive synergy that would create an overall level of performance greater than the sum of the inputs. C. A work team generates positive synergy through coordinated effort. 1. Individual efforts result in a level of performance that is greater than the sum of those individual inputs. a. Management is looking for that positive synergy that will allow their organizations to increase performance. b. The extensive use of teams creates the potential for an organization to generate greater outputs with no increase in inputs. c. Merely calling a group a team doesn’t automatically increase its performance. III. Types of Teams (Exhibit 10-2, slide 10-6) A.
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