The more recent poster appears to be for army

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The more recent poster appears to be for army recruitment. While it is quite the opposite, this poster is far more informative by comparison. We do see a soldier in action in a desert and the larger text states: Join the Australian Army. But the poster relies primarily on written text to dissuade potential recruits. In this example the ultimate target is the man or woman considering opposing fighting in the Middle East. The guilt of the earlier era is replaced by a sense of a personal, informed decision onthe part of the target, "informed" based on the written word, not just an image and a slogan.These are examples of successful propaganda design in that they both address a larger issue – war – with era-specific text and images. The earlier poster had a far more powerful graphic whereas the latter poster relies heavily on far more ‘information’ in its design, calculated to speak to a different generation from a different era. We will see more of these Australian posters in Lesson 4.
Slide 11: Propaganda for the Times: Health
As with the war posters, the same can be said for the posters on health care.Again, the first image of the man covering his mouth (left) speaks to a certain era over half a century ago. We can easily discern the aesthetic expectations of an audience at the time.The second poster (right) onhealth insurancefrom 2010 reliesexclusively on text and its design. This speaks to ease of the design of information perception from a more recent time.
Both the Australian posters and the health posters introduce us to the idea that propaganda has to ascertain who its target is and how best to effectively flip that target into action. These posters are examples of propaganda in that their intent is to elicit a YES response on the partof the audience.Above left: Public health campaign to try to halt the spread of TB (Source: U.S. National Library of Medicine, WikimediaCommons)Above right: Poster for Single Payer Insurance (Source: freestylee, flickr)Slide 12: Characteristics of PropagandaSlide 13: Final ThoughtsFor this course you will be required to read Randal Marlin’s Propaganda and the Ethics of Persuasionwhich is included in its electronic version as part of your course fees. Marlin’s work provides context for the various lessons. You may find it necessary to refer to his concepts in your discussion activities and in your term assignments.Lesson 2: What Is Propaganda? -Propaganda tells you what you already know, it builds on things you already know.Reading Notes: Chapter 1 “Why study propaganda?Out of the last two centuries a globally interconnected, mass-mediated society has emerged. The events of the twentieth century in particular have shown the enormous power, for good or evil, possessed by those who directly control or know how to manipulate the mass media.

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