Since individuality is good it is necessary to foster

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general welfare, that determines what is right and what is the best. Since individuality is good, it is necessary to foster social institutions that contribute to that  individuality. Free, uncensored debate is one such institution. So, more generally, is liberty, the right  to do as one wants free from the interference of others, so long as what one wants or one’s actions  do not cause harm to others. (It is however imperative to note that merely offending the moral  sensitivities and emotional/appetitive orientations of others does not count as harm, especially since  others often confuse feelings of repugnance with feelings of moral disapprobation.) Individuality also  ought to manifest in Democracy and representative government establishments as they too  contribute to the development of the individual, just as much as the reason that free speech so  contributes, since they too are social institutions that are justified on utilitarian grounds  
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c) J.S. Mill’s Conclusion a)      That our freedom and liberties are our entitlement only insofar as they do not infringe on the  liberties and freedoms of other persons. b)      That as much as we may enjoy the liberties and freedom to do as we wish and act the way we  act, our actions are enshrined in our liberties if they do not affect, in a negative way the interests and liberties of others. c)      Any action we undertake in the name of our freedoms and liberties is therefore naturally  restricted by the way it impact and exerts on the freedoms and liberties of others. d)     Freedom is only freedom insofar as it favours the exercise of freedom and liberties by others,  without causing inconveniences or harm to others in the process of enjoying and executing it.   J.S. Mill’s conceptualization of human freedom and liberty is derived from the  “harm principle”  which  states that do and act in whichever way you choose or please as long as your actions, all conditions  considered do not hurt or infringe on the rights and liberties of others. This principles is drawn from a wider philosophical ethical theory- Utilitarianism (act in such a way that your actions create the  greatest happiness for the greatest majority)      1.46 SUBTOPIC 3: On  Liberty of Thought and Individuality  (abridged) a)      If all mankind minus one were of one opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing  that one person than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
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