Of the 110000 ha of king island 61800 ha is utilised

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Of the 110,000 ha of King Island, 61,800 ha is utilised as beef and dairy pasture. A further 21,600 ha is shrubby pasture and 16,300 ha is closed forest (Bureau of Rural Sciences 2007). Sustainable management of King Island’s agricultural industries is important for the future economy of the Island: ‘Every serious farmer wants to make things environmentally better’ 6 ‘All King Island farmers are conservationists’ 7 Fishing The crayfish industry is a large employer, with eighteen boats operating, the majority operating out of Currie Harbour, with a smaller number using Grassy Harbour. The industry is protected by a quota system, allowing fishermen to land a maximum of 143 kg/pot/year, seasonal closures, no females to be taken between May and mid-November and a complete yearly shut-down from mid- September until November. These measures ensure breeding stock can carry and dispatch their eggs, therefore securing the viability of both the species and the industry. Crayfish is sold to the live export market via Victorian processors. 4 King Island Biodiversity Management Plan – Community Workshop Quote 5 King Island Biodiversity Management Plan – Community Workshop Quote 6 King Island Biodiversity Management Plan – Community Workshop Quote 7 King Island Biodiversity Management Plan – Community Workshop Quote King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 11
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Black and greenlip abalone are targeted by the Island’s two divers. This product is destined for the export market, live, canned or dried. This sector is also protected by a strict quota system. An oyster farm at Sea Elephant River produces approximately 5,000 dozen oysters per annum for the King Island market. It is estimated that the fishing industry brings about $20 million into the community annually. Tourism The tourist market, whilst still relatively small, is important to the economy of King Island and is seeking to grow for future prosperity. Approximately 6% of the Island’s labour force is directly employed through the tourism industry ( ). Kelp Harvesting Since the 1970s storm-cast Bull Kelp ( Durvillaea potatorum) has been collected from King Island’s coastline by harvesters and carted to the Kelp Industries factory for drying and milling. The dried Kelp is exported to European customers for use in the biopolymer industry as well as into the Australian market for fertiliser, animal feed and a wide variety of other uses. Kelp is a significant source of employment, through both the factory and Kelp carters. 2.4 Community consultation A draft King Island Multi-Species Recovery Plan was prepared in 2008, based on a desk top study with little community consultation apart from the option to comment on the draft; this was met with opposition from sectors of the King Island community. The concern included a desire for the people of the Island to be more involved in the Plan’s development as well as controversy regarding the initial actions identified within the Plan.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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