Splash continued native speakers are more accessible

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A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists
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Chapter 4 / Exercise 7
A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists
Beisse
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Splash! (continued) native speakers are more accessible to ELLs when they can proceed at their own pace, repeat and review as necessary, look up further information, and so on. That they can do all these things away from the judgment and scrutiny of peers and teacher empowers them to become independent learners. 7. Revise and clarify information. Learning is an evolutionary and transformational process. As we learn new things, we figure out how our new knowledge fits into what we already knew. We revise what we previously believed to be true, or we form new opinions. When teachers clarify new information or help ELLs to revise their own understandings, they expand knowledge. Helping ELLs to add to or expand their definitions of words or learn how they are used idiomatically is a very easy but effective way for teachers to build content and language knowledge simultaneously. Cognitively Complex Tasks The focus of the Common Core standards is for learners to develop abilities to read, under- stand, and undertake progressively more complex academic tasks, and, ultimately, to gener- ate and test hypotheses, especially in science (Chapter 7). For ELLs, the complexity resides both in the language and in the content, and so it is especially important to prepare them in to engage with more complex academic material. Useful strategies for teaching cognitively complex tasks include the following: 1. Organize learners for cognitively complex tasks. Learners may benefit from working in groups to “pool” their knowledge and skills to complete cognitively complex tasks. Students who are linguistically more advanced are often able to help those less pro- ficient, explaining or describing using language that is closer to their comprehension levels. Before group work can be effective, however, teachers may need to analyze texts and ensure that ELLs are knowledgeable about the structure and vocabulary found in complex academic writing. 2. Engage learners in complex tasks. What ELLs find complex may differ from what native speakers find complex because of gaps in language. An activity that works well for young ELLs is to engage them in a discussion of whether a story is true, possibly true, or fantasy, and make them defend their decisions about each. Even first graders can take part in an activity such as the one in Kerry Kangaroo Hops . © 2015 Bridgepoint Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Not for resale or redistribution.
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A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists
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Chapter 4 / Exercise 7
A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists
Beisse
Expert Verified
Section 8.3 High-Impact Strategies Older and more advanced learners need to engage in problem-solving, decision mak- ing, and experimental inquiry. Math, social studies, and science are all well-suited to these tasks. One math example is shown in Five Ideas for Cooperative Learning , but other subjects also lend themselves to problem-solving and decision making. One effective technique for use in any subject area is to use scenarios. Teachers con- struct in advance scenarios that involve problems to be solved. In A Courtroom in the Classroom

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