Video collaboration studios vcs is continually

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3. Video Collaboration Studios (VCS) is continually growing new studios globally. The immersive environment created by VCS allows employees to connect face to face from any part of the world as if they were in the same room. These studios greatly reduce the need for travel—saving money and time and reducing carbon footprint. What factors are overlooked?
4. Is there more to the “not-invented-here” syndrome than simply hurt feelings on the part of those who believe they are being dictated to by headquarters? It can be argued that globalised programmes are often perceived by subsidiaries as cutting into their autonomy and the dictatorial approaches taken by headquarters. Country managers are treated more like subordinates rather than customers; i.e., no internal marketing is even attempted. The fruitful dialog that characterises a relationship between equal partners does not occur. The likelihood of not-invented-here occurring is heightened due to organisational changes, many of which may be perceived as threats. Globalization by design requires a balance between sensitivity to local needs and deployment of technologies and concepts globally. This means that neither headquarters nor independent country managers alone can call the shots. If country organizations are not part of the planning process, or if adoption is forced on them by headquarters, local resistance in the form of the not-invented-here (NIH) syndrome ay lead to the demise of the global program or to an overall decline in morale. Subsidiary resistance may stem from resistance to any idea originating from the outside or from valid concerns about the applicability of a concept to that market. Overall, the best approach against the emergence of the NIH syndrome is utilizing various motivational polices, such as ensuring that local managers participate in the development of marketing strategies and programs for global brands. For example, when Coca-Cola re-entered the Indian market in 1993, it invested most heavily in its Coke brand, using its typical global positioning, and saw its market leadership to Pepsi. Recognising the mistake, Coke started to involve more local marketers in the strategy making process and re-emphasised a popular local Cola brand (Thump Up) and refocused the Coke brand advertising to be more relevant to the local Indian consumer. Then in the past 10 years, Coca-Cola has been acquiring local soft-drink brands and re-gains its Indian market.

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