Br d ænd bt r bread and butter ɛ ˈ ʌ ə m t ænd

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br d ænd b t r – bread and butter ɛ ˈ ʌ ə m t ænd grit – meet and greet ɪ m st ð b s – missed the bus ɪ ə ʌ
IV. Non-Verbal Cues (Gestures) Public speaking To be an effective speaker you must project earnestness, enthusiasm, and sincerity by making your manner and actions affirm what you say. Audience determines if you: are sincere welcome the opportunity to address them truly believe what you’re saying are interested in them and care about them are confident and in control of the situation Elements of Nonverbal elements of Public Speaking physical appearance Posture Gestures body movements facial expression Why Physical Actions help? When you demonstrate purposeful, effective physical action while speaking in front of an audience, you provide a true barometer of your feelings and attitudes. 1. Messages Are More Memorable. People become bored with static presentations. 2. Punctuation Adds Meaning. gestures, body movements, and facial expressions 3. Nervous Tension Is Channeled Fear and nervousness in public speaking work on three levels: o Emotional - conquered by self-confidence o Mental - by product of preparation and experience o Physical - conquered through conscious use of gestures and body movements Five general methods for strengthening your body’s spoken image 1. Eliminate Distracting Mannerisms “The speaker who stands and talks at ease is the one who can be heard without weariness. If his posture and gestures are so graceful and unobtrusive that no one notices them, he may be counted truly successful.” - Dr. Ralph C. Smedley Mannerism are: Rocking Swaying Pacing gripping or leaning on the lectern tapping the fingers biting or licking the lips jingling pocket change frowning adjusting hair or clothing turning the head and eyes from side to side like an oscillating fan physical manifestations of simple nervousness and they are performed unconsciously STEPS IN ELIMINATING SUPERFLUOUS MANNERISMS obtain an accurate perception of your body’s spoken image eliminate any physical behavior that doesn’t add to your speeches: by being aware of your problem areas by conscious self-monitoring during future presentations. If you have several problem areas, work on one at a time. 2. Be Natural, Spontaneous, and Conversational.
The single most important rule for making your body speak effectively is to be yourself. The emphasis is on communication and the sharing of ideas – not on performance or sermonizing. Don’t try to imitate another speaker. Instead, let yourself respond naturally and spontaneously to what you think, feel, and say. Strive to be as genuine and natural as when you talk with friends or family members. 3. Let Your Body Mirror Your Feelings. “A person under the influence of his feelings projects the real self, acting naturally and spontaneously. A speaker who is interested will usually be interesting.” - Dale Carnegie (Father of modern public speaking) 4. Build Self-Confidence through Preparation.

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