These could include the following A small variance in schedule or budget starts

These could include the following a small variance in

This preview shows page 8 - 10 out of 15 pages.

Look for signs that the project maybe in trouble. These could include the following:A small variance in schedule or budget starts to get bigger, especially early in the project. There is a tendency to think you can make it up, but
Image of page 8
this is a warning. If the tendencies are not corrected quickly, the impact will be unrecoverable.You discover that activities you think have already been completed are stillbeing worked on. For example, users whom you think have been migrated to a new platform are still not.You need to rely on unscheduled overtime to hit the deadlines, especially early in the project.Team morale starts to decline.Deliverable quality or service quality starts to deteriorate. For instance, users start to complain that their converted e-mail folders are not working correctly.Quality-control steps, testing activities, and project management time starts to be cut back from the original schedule. A big project, such as an Exchange migration, can affect everyone in your organization. Don't cut back on the activities that ensure the work is done correctly.If these situations occur, raisevisibility through risk management, and put together a plan to proactivelyensure that the project stays on track. If you cannot successfully managethrough the problems, raise an issue.MANAGING SCOPE6:Ensure that the sponsor approves scope-change requestsAfter the basics of managing theschedule, managing scope is the most important activity required to control aproject. Many project failures are not caused by problems with estimating orteam skill sets but by the project team working on major and minor deliverablesthat were not part of the original project definition or business requirements.Even if you have good scope-management procedures in place, there are still twomajor areas of scope-change management that must be understood to besuccessful: understanding who the customer is and scope creep.In general, the project sponsor isthe person funding the project. For infrastructure projects like an Exchangemigration, the sponsor might be the CIO or CFO. Although there is usually justone sponsor, a big project can have many stakeholders, or people who areimpacted by the project. Requests for scope changes will most often come fromstakeholders — many of whom may be managers in their own right. One managermight want chat services for his or her area. Another might want an exceptionto the size limits you have placed on mailboxes. It doesn't matter howimportant a change is to a stakeholder, they can't make scope-change decisions,and they can't give your team the approval to make the change. In properscope-change management, the sponsor (or a designate) must give the approval,since they are the only ones who can add funding to cover the changes and knowif the project impact is acceptable.7:Guard against scope creepMost project managers know to invokescope-change management procedures if they are asked to add a major newfunction or a major new deliverable to their project.
Image of page 9
Image of page 10

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 15 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture