They should be assessed before during and after reading the text Before reading

They should be assessed before during and after

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reading the text. Before reading any text, you should first assess your student’s prior knowledge to the topic. This will help you plan targeted instruction to meet the needs ofall your students. If the students have minimal information on the topic, you should incorporate supplemental texts to build the student’s background knowledge before reading the text. Students should also be assessed during their readings. In the book, it explains the importance of having your students stop reading periodically so they can record the important information that they have just read. This allows the teacher to seehow students are making sense of what they are reading. After reading, you can ask yourstudents to make intertextual connections and encourage them to make their own judgements about the text to assess their overall understanding. You could also have your students create a timeline pertaining to the text, which requires students to analyzeand represent their understanding. 2.Strategies used by the teacher that helped solve comprehension problems:Modeling – makes her thinking “visible” to the studentsMaking observations regarding the titleClose and slow reading to break the big words apartUsing context clues Using evidence from the text to support you claims Rereading 3.The writing assignments that I had to complete in mathematics, science, and social studies were completely different from a typical English paper. The papers typically consisted of numbers that were not written out, along with several graphics including charts and diagrams. They were commonly longer than the papers I was required to write in English. The writing was more structured, and you were required to label everything.4.As it mentions in the book, talk is at the heart of classroom teaching and learning. Engaging students in meaningful conversations and encouraging them to talk with each other sets up context for deep conceptual learning. Talk is particularly important for understanding difficult vocabulary, developing conceptual knowledge, and learning to read and write in discipline-specific ways.
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5.One of the strategies from the Leland and Lewison Book that resonated the most with me was the “reading buddy.” In the book, it suggested that it might be easier for a student to share their thoughts with one person rather than a whole group. I personally agree with this and feel that this would be a great strategy to implement in the beginning of the school year to give students time to gain their own confidence. It also gives each student someone they should feel comfortable talking with. Therefore, if theydon’t fully understand something, they will have a “buddy” they can always discuss it with.
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  • Fall '12
  • Trousdale
  • common core, Jinnie Spiegler

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