Nurse Leaders Nursing staff leaders represent each department of the hospital

Nurse leaders nursing staff leaders represent each

This preview shows page 11 - 14 out of 17 pages.

[ Nurse Leaders] Nursing staff leaders represent each department of the hospital. These leaders work with fellow nurses to display and distribute materials to recruit Patient/Family Champions. They will encourage staff as new PFAC ideas are implemented. Nurses spend many hands-on hours caring for patients and families. They have the front-line experience to bring to the meetings and likely a deeper empathy for the experiences, feelings, and ideas shared by the Patient/Family Champions. Having nurses represent each department ensures that all ages, stages, disease processes, and surgical types are represented and being recruited. [Patient/Family Champions] The average reported hospital stay in 2017 was 5.5 days or less (Ellison and Cohen, 2017). Recruiting Patient/Family Champions from patient populations with these longer lengths of stay may be easier. However, areas such as labor and delivery and
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ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP 12 some surgical specialties that have decreased lengths of stay, nurses will have to be vigilant to recruit Champions that indicate a willingness to be advocates. Special consideration to include members from ages and stages of life, encompass the varied race and ethnicities served by the hospital and different types of family structures will be imperative for a successful PFAC. Ideally, there will be between 2 - 4 Champions representing each hospital department. [PFAC Secretary] The Secretary is responsible for securing the meeting space, setting meeting times and keeping minutes. Additionally, generates and distributes printed and electronic materials and coordinates meeting refreshments. Leadership Style To develop the PFAC team, the Emotional Leadership style will be utilized. This team is going to be comprised of individuals who will be active, engaged, and invested in the well-being and future of St. Thomas Midtown’s patients and families. Emotional Leadership embodies both personal and social elements. Accurate self-assessment allows the leader to pinpoint their strengths and weaknesses. Adaptability allows for flexibility and change as needed. Empathy allows the leader to put themselves in someone else’s shoes. Managing relationships well will inspire, encourage and build the team well (Sullivan). Implementation The PFCA Lead begins the process of forming the team and will recruit hospital volunteers from within administration and nursing. Once the hospital employee members are recruited, the initial meeting will be to discuss the recruitment process for Patient/Family Champions. There will be an initial hospital-wide communication about the formation of the PFAC. This communication will prepare the staff for upcoming changes and request nursing help to recruit Champions. Employing the Emotional Leadership style, the team will acknowledge
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ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP 13 any concerns the staff may have about integrating patient/family ideas into daily practice and reinforce the value of their help with the upcoming changes (Archangel, 2017).
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