Can you do a causal study when much of the primary

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Can you do a Causal Study When Much of the Primary Data Collected is Descriptive Opinion and Ordinal or Interval Data? This GEM study shows it is possible to conduct a causal study when the primary data is collected and is descriptive opinion and ordinal data. This study was able to show a causal relationship given these parameters, so yes, a causal study can be done. As stated early it would be best to enhance the study past just a causation study so the findings can be more accurate. The key factor which can lead to a causal study being done when the primary data collected is descriptive opinion is the use of key informants. Though causative factors can be very elusive (Reckless, 1941), these experts can use their experience and knowledge to provide observation on the variables in this case study. This reliable knowledge allows a causal study to be done with ordinal or interval data and allows for the researchers to have some control over the differences found in each country. References English Standard Bible. (2001).
6 A Gem of a Study Case Study Homburg, C., Klarmann, M., Reimann, M., & Schilke, O. (2012). What drives key informant accuracy? Journal of Marketing Research (JMR), 49 (4), 594–608. - org.ezproxy.liberty.edu/10.1509/jmr.09.0174 Kalton, G. (1968). Standardization: A technique to control for extraneous variables. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series C (Applied Statistics), 17 (2), 118. - org.ezproxy.liberty.edu/10.2307/2985676 Reckless, W. C. (1941). The implications of prediction in sociology. American Sociological Review, 6 (4), 471–477. Schindler, P. S. (2021). Business research methods (13th ed.). McGraw-Hill Education. Simintiras, A. C., Yeniaras, V., Oney, E., & Bahia, T. K. (2014). Redefining confidence for consumer behavior research. Psychology & Marketing, 31 (6), 426–439. - org.ezproxy.liberty.edu/10.1002/mar.20705 Spector, P. E. (2019). Do not cross me: optimizing the use of cross-sectional designs. Journal of Business & Psychology, 34 (2), 125–137. - org.ezproxy.liberty.edu/10.1007/s10869-018-09613-8

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