Momentous achievement for the civil rights movement

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

momentous achievement for the Civil Rights Movement; however, at the same time, its massive resistance and weak implementation posed a new threat in the African American plight for equal education. The remains of segregation in Southern education continues to yield unequal opportunities for poor black students, keeping them at the bottom of social hierarchy. In 1954, the Supreme Court held that public schools segregated “solely on the basis of race” deprived equal education opportunities for children of color, violating the Fourteenth Amendment’s “equal protection” clause (Champagne 60). The decision to end racial segregation in American public education was seen as hope towards equality, but yet ten years after Brown , only 2 percent of black students in the South attended integrated schools (Porter et al. 578). Even though the Brown decision follows American values of democracy by ruling that separate is inherently unequal, its stark cultural and social changes from the past provoked white Southerners to avert public school integration by all means (Ladson-Billings 5). State and local governments, partial to white elites, went as far as closing down entire public school systems to allowing privately funded segregation academies. These segregation academies One of the Brown’s failures was the absence of any actual methods for desegregating schools. The political strength and prevalent racial hostility of white Southerners sanctioned a massive resistance to the integration policy, and hopeful black students faced violence and intimidation (Allison 153-4). Another disappointment to black plaintiffs and lawyers was the ruling of Brown II in 1955, which ordered local courts to desegregate public schools “with all
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

deliberate speed”. The language of the decision was criticized for its ambiguity and evidently
Image of page 2
You've reached the end of this preview.
  • Winter '14
  • Peters,Aaron
  • Supreme Court of the United States, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern