Potentially sit out on the street and access your

Info icon This preview shows pages 60–61. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
potentially sit out on the street and access your wireless access point configuration interface that we're looking at right here,and make changes to it, that would not be good, so, to obscure things just a little bit, let's use a different SSID for this access point. We're going to just use some random letters and characters, the thing you want to do here is not give away who owns this access point based on the SSID. Instead of putting like a company name or a family name or whatever, let's just use some random characters, and by doing this, someone who picks up this SSID is going to say, "I'm not sure who that access point belongs to." Now we need to configure the wireless modem, we have several different options we can choose from, one, is to make a 802.11g only wireless access point, if you only had 802.11g wireless devices, you could do that, there actually aren't that many of them left around, so that's probably not an option we'd want to use, another option is to configure the access point so it supports all 802.11 standard, 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11n, now this is good because it will allow basically all 802.11 devices to connect,even really, really, fifteen year old devices that have an old 802.11b radio on it would still be able to connect. The problem with doing this is that one of your radios on your access point will have to be used for 2.4 gigahertz communication while the other's used for your five gigahertz communications. That works, but it actually impacts your five gigahertz bandwidth because we could actually take both radios and use both of them for five gigahertz communications and thereby double the bandwidth available to 802.11n wireless clients. If we only have five gigahertz wireless clients in our network, then we can just basically turn off the 2.4 gigahertz radio, we really don't need it, and by doing this, we can actually increase the amount of radio bandwidth available for 802.11n wireless clients. So that's what I'm going to do in this situation,I don't have any 802.11b or g devices left in this network, everything's 802.11n, so I'm just going toturn off the 2.4 gigahertz radio completely. Now we have to specify the bandwidth, and this is an interesting parameter, by default, notice it was set to 20 megahertz, and that actually doesn't make a whole lot of sense for an 802.11n because with it set to 802.11n, we're only going to be using five gigahertz radio settings, so what we actually should do is set it to 40 megahertz instead of 20. Now, here's another option you need to decide about, and that is broadcast SSID. If I leave this option turned on, then my access point is going to periodically broadcast the network name, the SSID up here, so that people can find it easily, and that's the benefit of leaving broadcast SSID turned on, is that you can find it really easily, the problem is, you can find it really easily, even if you're an attacker and not an end-user, so for this reason, a lot of administrators actually turn broadcast SSID off. Does it make your network completely secure? No, it just obscures it a little bit,makes it harder to find, a determined attacker can still locate it, but a casual attacker
Image of page 60

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 61
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern