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Unformatted text preview: signi¡cant because they allow us to predict the behaviours oF a given circuit with a known arrangement oF electric components. It was expected that a simple electric circuit would obey these laws, which was veri¡ed in this experiment. Introduction According to Ohm’s law, the voltage (V) across a resistance (R) is directly proportional to the current fowing through it: V=RI (1). By KirchoFF’s Current Law (KCL), the algebraic sum oF the currents entering any node is zero; similarly by KirchoFF’s Voltage Law (KVL), the algebraic sum oF the voltages around any loop is zero. Also, the current division rule and voltage division rule state that both the current in each resistance connected in parallel and the voltage in each resistance connected in series are divided proportional to the resistance oF the component [1]. These laws are very signi¡cant because they allow us to predict the behaviours oF a given circuit with a known arrangement oF electric components. It was expected that a simple electric circuit would obey these laws, which was veri¡ed in this experiment. Introduction Theory Background Purpose The objective of this experiment was to verify Kirchoff’s Current Law (KCL) and Kirchoff’s Voltage Law (KVL) in a simple electrical circuit. These laws allow us to predict the behaviours of a circuit with a known arrangement of electric components. Ohm’s law states that the voltage (V) across a resistance (R) is directly proportional to the current Fowing through it: V=RI (1). By Kirchoff’s Current Law (KCL), the algebraic sum of the currents entering any node is zero; similarly by Kirchoff’s Voltage Law (KVL), the algebraic sum of the voltages around any loop is zero. Also, the current division rule and voltage division rule state that both the current in each resistance connected in parallel and the voltage in each resistance connected in series are divided proportional to the resistance of the component [1]. Introduction The objective of this experiment was to verify Kirchoff’s Current Law (KCL) and Kirchoff’s Voltage Law (KVL) in a simple electrical circuit. These laws allow us to predict the behaviours of a circuit with a known arrangement of electric components. Ohm’s law states that the voltage (V) across a resistance (R) is directly proportional to the current Fowing through it: V=RI (1). By Kirchoff’s Current Law (KCL), the algebraic sum of the currents entering any node is zero; similarly by Kirchoff’s Voltage Law (KVL), the algebraic sum of the voltages around any loop is zero. Also, the current division rule and voltage division rule state that both the current in each resistance connected in parallel and the voltage in each resistance connected in series are divided proportional to the resistance of the component [1]....
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  • Fall '08
  • Irish
  • Atomic Radius, Electrical impedance, Kirchhoff's circuit laws, Unknown Metal Sample, voltage division rule, lowest resonance frequencies

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