How does this apply to infinity you may ask Based on our example we did not

How does this apply to infinity you may ask based on

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How does this apply to infinity, you may ask? Based on our “example,” we did not need to knowthe exact number of seat or people to compare the two sets of p and s. “Through pairing, we can determine whether the cardinality of a set is less than, more than, or the same as the cardinality of another set without knowing the number of objects in either set” (p. 12). Is this confusing? Well, the overall concept is that “in the realm of the infinite, ordinary intuition proves inadequate” (p. 12). This is probably why it was so hard for earlier mathmaticians to understand Cantor’s work. The way that may be easiest to understand, is to imagine having a bag of jelly beans as a child. Do you remember saying to your friends, “One for you, one for me,” as you separated the pile between you? That is the same concept! Just imagine using number in place of the jelly beans, and having an unlimited supply of numbers to share.Georg Cantor wasn’t finished with his discoveries yet. He continued by proving that there are different sizes of infinity. Using “power sets,” Cantor proved that the cardinality power of the power set is always greater than the cardinality of the original set. Here’s an example: the power set of {1, 2, 3, 4} contains 24
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