King island biodiversity management plan 135 the

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King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 135
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The clearance of vegetation adjacent to and upstream of the species’ riparian habitat may lead to an increase in flood events, higher nutrient and sediment loadings, weed invasion and possible herbicide contamination. The Ettrick River subpopulation, which consists of three patches of plants spread over about one kilometre, has been under threat in recent years from a proposed dam several hundred metres upstream of the site — subsequent changes to river flows are likely to have an impact on the fern’s recolonisation opportunities due to changes in deposition and scouring levels. Land clearance and dam construction are considered to be moderate potential threats to the species. Trampling by cattle is an ongoing issue for the Pass River and Ettrick River sites on King Island, with clear signs of disturbance at the latter site in early 2009 (Wapstra et al. 2009). The river reserves that support the species are typically 50 m wide, and are mostly unfenced. This issue was partly addressed in early 2010, with fencing now in place along sections of the Ettrick River’s southern bank. The Pass River site has been overrun by dense infestations of the weedy grass Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue). The subpopulation at this site is not considered viable due to the level of habitat degradation and the very low plant numbers (with just 5 plants spread over 4 m). The small size of the subpopulations on King Island means that the risk of extinction from stochastic events is high, while drying conditions associated with climate change may lead to a diminution of available habitat for the species. Recovery Actions specific to King Island Provide information and extension support to the King Island Natural Resource Management committee, King Island council, Government agencies and the local community on the location, significance and management of known subpopulations and areas of potential habitat; Maintain the stock-proof fences along the Ettrick River — check condition annually and repair as required; Negotiate with landholders to ensure that vegetation to the north and south of the Ettrick River subpopulation is protected. Encourage landholders to consider protection of habitat through a vegetation management agreement or conservation covenant under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002 ; Investigate the feasibility of propagating plants from spores collected from the Ettrick River site and supplementing the wild population; Monitor the Ettrick River subpopulation annually to determine the level of recruitment and/or plant loss; if monitoring identifies a decline in the subpopulation, then adopt an adaptive management approach to minimise the impacts of threats.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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