There are two types of rationalization one is sour

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There are two types of rationalization. One is "sour grapes," a term from  Aesop 's fable  about the fox who said that the grapes too high to reach were sour anyway. For  example, a person after failing to get into a law school may justify himself by saying: "I  would have hated being a lawyer anyway." The second, more productive type of the  rationalization is the "silver lining," an assumption that everything happens for the best,  so one should try to find the blessing in disguise. "So, I didn't get into law school, but  now I can really focus on finding my true vocation." Rationalization is a  post-hoc  (after the fact) defense mechanism, connected to the self- serving bias: failure is ascribed to outside factors, whereas success comes from  oneself. Reaction formation In  psychoanalytic theory , reaction formation is a defense mechanism in which anxiety- producing or unacceptable emotions are replaced by their direct opposites. For  example, one who is strongly attracted to  pornography , but  has  moral  or  religious  obligations to avoid it, might become its staunch critic. Anna Freud  called this defense mechanism "believing the opposite." When we have an  emotion or a reaction that is too threatening or too anxiety provoking, we turn it into the  opposite. That way, there is no threat from that emotion, or even awareness of the  emotion. Love turns into hate, and hate turns into love. This reversed feeling, resulting from reaction formation, may become excessive: "Hell  has no fury like a woman scorned." Problems may start especially when (like  with  denial  and  repression ) a person starts to do this automatically, losing sight of his or  her real feelings Ken Wilber (in his book  Integral Psychology ), considered reaction formation  neurotic  defense. Arising from issues of self-concept, he suggested that it is amenable to uncovering and interpretive therapy.
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Regression Regression involves the reversion to an earlier stage of development in the face of  unacceptable impulses. When we are faced with anxiety, we tend to retreat, as if in a  "psychological time machine," to the point in time when we last felt secure and safe— our childhood. Under stress, or in an anxiety-provoking situation, people very often can  become more childish and primitive. Even an adult may want to curl up in bed in a fetal  position. Regression is an attempt to recapture some childhood satisfaction by relating to the  world in a way that was formerly effective (even though no longer so), and giving up  mature problem solving methods of dealing with challenges. It is as if the person is 
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