Healthy behavior however it is quite clear ellis has

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healthy behavior.” However, it is quite clear Ellis has simply given up the notion that absolutistic supernatural beliefs will always, and of necessity, lead to disturbance. Why has he given up this notion? Because, as a matter of fact, people holding such beliefs have turned out not always to be disturbed and sometimes have turned out to be less disturbed than individuals who do not hold supernatural beliefs. If such beliefs actually contributed to disturbance and/or to thwarting an individual’s deepest and most enduring desires, Ellis would declare them “emotionally unhealthy” regardless of how consistent they were with supernatural doctrine. It is the actual concrete effect on human beings living life in time that is carrying the day and not the consistency with that which is proclaimed to be revealed supernatural truth. Summary REBT is a process of: (1) identifying feeling/sensation/images and overt behaviors which inhibit, or diminish, more effective pursuit of what clients experience as their deepest and most abiding desires; (2) relating these dysfunctions to irrational beliefs; (3) inducing clients to practice, practice, practice giving them up and (4) inducing clients to adopt more self-helping beliefs and practices related to their deepest desires. Inept and Unethical Practice Admittedly, each and every one of these activities can be done stupidly, ineptly, ineffectually and unethically. This fact is no more, or less, true when supernatural beliefs, and practices, are involved. Thus, when Johnson et al. (2000) note, “There is the danger of trivializing or uncritically disputing the client’s religious beliefs” (p. 16) one might add, “Indeed, it is always a danger to trivialize or uncritically dispute any client belief which is not trivial or is critical to dealing with the client’s issues.” If there are mistakes possible in working with clients who do not hold supernatural beliefs that are not possible with clients who do hold supernatural beliefs and vice versa, I do not, yet, know what they are. When one is identifying relevant events, which serve to activate thoughts/beliefs and/or feeling/sensation/images and/or overt behavioral concomitants, then failing to identify the appropriate and relevant activating events (A’s), thoughts/beliefs or feeling/sensation/ images and overt behavioral concomitants is a mistake, whether they be about a, purportedly, natural or supernatural world. Similarly, at 181 The implication of this analysis for practice is that REBT practitioners can readily, even happily, speak metaphorically, including making use of religious metaphors, when doing so helps their client. The practitioner can do so without demanding the client recognize the language as metaphorical. Insofar as it has any practical meaning, religious language will refer to actual life-in-time events, powers and effects. When attempting to help those we serve address issues of transcendence,
it is much more important to focus on how these events, powers and effects are used, rather than what they are called.

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