6 Although his first in clin ation was to accept the offer he eventually

6 although his first in clin ation was to accept the

This preview shows page 31 - 33 out of 33 pages.

6. Although his first in clin ation was to accept the offer, he eventually decided to de cline it. 7. Rubber is a flex ible material. 8. The function of a pro pel ler is to drive a ship or plane forwards. 9. He was at tract ed to pure science but in the end chose an engineering major. 10. He felt de ject ed after his job application was re ject ed by the company.
Image of page 31
An Introduction to Academic Discourse (4 th ed.) 2014-2015 page 32 PRESENTATIONS: Comparison During the semester, students will give one or more presentations of around 3 to 4 minutes using only note cards as a memory aid. PowerPoint, the blackboard, or other visual aids should not be used. Teachers should schedule roughly a half dozen presentations for the end of each of the four core units with the topics being connected to the particular rhetorical mode of the writing component. For example, in unit 1 a half dozen or so students will give extended definitions; in unit 2, the next half dozen will speak about problems and solutions or causes and effects; in unit 3, the topics will be based on comparison ; and in unit 4, they will be based on argument. As mentioned above, if time allows, students can give more than one presentation during the semester. Order of speakers As a general rule, it is advisable not to follow ID number order when drawing up the schedule of speakers so students should be allowed to draw lots and leave it to chance. Speakers need at least a week’s notice to prepare their presentation so determining the order of speakers for the whole semester is probably best done as early as possible. Presentations can be done individually, in pairs, or in groups as long as the students all do an equal amount of preparation and speak for roughly the same amount of time. Comparison topics Teachers can select the topics for comparison or can let students choose. Topics should be chosen for their interest value and need not be connected to any particular theme. Organization Students should first of all identify themselves and then identify the topic they are going to speak about. Presentations that deal with a comparison can closely follow the written model, that is, students start off with an introduction and then go on to discuss the topic using either the by-subject method or the point-by-point method. A formal conclusion is necessary. Delivery Students are not allowed to use PowerPoint or other visual aids so one of the key features is their delivery. They must not read out their presentation but can refer to brief notes written on note cards. The tone is relaxed, informal and conversational. The delivery should be authoritative with students speaking slowly and clearly, moving and making appropriate gestures, and maintaining eye contact with the audience.
Image of page 32
Image of page 33

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 33 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture