Correlates their tv watching with schoolchildrens

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Correlates their TV watching with schoolchildren’s aggressiveness The more violent the content of the child’s TV viewing the more aggressive the child (Eron, 1987; Turner & others, 1986) Relationship is modest
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Consistently found in North America, Europe and Australia Extends to devious indirect aggression Test the hidden third factor explanation by statistically pulling out the influence of some of these possible factors Compared with those who watched little violence (Belson, 1978) Those boys who watched a great deal admitted to 50% more violent acts during the preceding six months Examined 22 likely third factors e.g. family size, preexisting lower intelligence, hostility The heavy violence and light violence viewers still differenced After the researchers equated them with respect to potential third factors Heavy viewers were indeed more violent because of their TV exposure Violence viewing among 875 8-year-olds correlated with aggressiveness even after statistically pulling out several obvious possible third factors (Eron & Huesmann, 1980, 1985) When they restudied those individuals as 19- year-olds Discovered that viewing violence at age 8 modestly predicted aggressiveness at age 19 Aggressiveness at age 8 did not predict viewing violence at age 19 Aggression followed viewing not the reverse By age 30, those who had watched the most violence in childhood were more likely than others to have been convicted of a crime When television goes increased violence follows TV viewing experiments The trailblazing Bobo-doll experiments (Bandura and Richard Walters, 1963) Watched violent TV episode or various control episodes that were not violent Manipulated whether aggressor in video was rewarded or not
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Observed children in play area after they watched video Aggression defined as number of times the children hi the bobo doll Viewing rewarded violence increases violent behaviors in children Viewing unrewarded violence does not necessarily increase violence Berkowitz and Geen (1966) found that angered college students who viewed a violent film Acted more aggressively than did similarly angered students who viewed nonaggressive films Confirmed that viewing violence amplifies aggression (Anderson & others, 2003) Showed delinquent boys a series of either aggressive or nonaggressive commercial films (Parke, 1977; Leyens, 1975) Exposure to movie violence led to an increase in viewer aggression Compared with the week preceding the film series Physical attacks increased sharply in cottages where boys were viewing violent films Zillmann and Weaver (1999) Exposed men and women on four consecutive days to violent or nonviolent feature films When participating in a different project on the fifth day Those exposed to the violent films were more hostile to the research assistant Why does TV viewing affect behavior?
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  • Fall '16
  • Relational aggression, Bushman,  Berkowitz

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