regularly scheduled to work from 7am to 7pm on weekdays and since all

Regularly scheduled to work from 7am to 7pm on

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regularly scheduled to work from 7am to 7pm on weekdays, and since all supervisors left at 5pm, it was possible almost every day to finish a day’s work by 5:30 and leave the plant. If one of the group’s members stayed until 7pm, he or she could punch the time cards of the others and help them gain free time without pay loss. To achieve this, the
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group would work extra hard during peak periods. Thus, the desired output was still satisfied with high standards of quality. Off the job, Sarto group members often joined in parties or weekend trips. Another informal group, the Clark group, operated in a similar way. Often times, the Sarto group would exclude people who were not associated with them. This included hardworking, dedicated employees like Bob Pearson. Furthermore, some employees that were not part of the group, such as Herman Schell, slacked off and consistently produced below level. Such behavior created difficult power dynamics within the organization. Ralph Porter must decide whether or not to confront the workers about their dishonesty. It is a tough decision to make because while the workers are behaving unethically, they are still getting the job done and producing high quality products. Interestingly, the Slade Company pays less than most manufacturing companies of its kind. The 1996 starting salary in the Slade Plating Department was $8.00; Tony Sarto’s hourly wage was $12.00. The average wage for some skilled workers in the U.S. was $12.00. Firms similar to Slade in the Michigan area, such as suppliers to the auto industry, paid an average hourly wage of $14.70. [CR] A Note for Analyzing Work Groups Group Context : Organization’s strategy, Organization’s history, Physical context, Customers, suppliers and competitors, Labor market, Financial market, Cultural, political and legal systems. Group Design Factors : Group composition (demographics, competencies, interests, working styles, values), Task Design (required activities, required interactions, interdependencies, variety and scope/activity and time, significance, autonomy), Formal Organization (structure- division of labor, reporting relationships, centralization/decentralization, systems- measurement, rewards/compensation, information systems, staffing- selection, recruitment, promotion) Group Culture: Emergent activities, emergent interactions, shared values, norms, roles and status, subgroups, rituals, myths, and shared language, shared conventions Group Outcomes and Feedback: does output meet standards? Does group experience contribute to personal well-being and development of members? Does the group experience enhance the capability of the members to work and learn together in the future? 18. Organizational Culture II Mon, Nov 13 Slade Plating Department [CR] Evaluating an Action Plan
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