Demonstrated sufficient evidence of their ability to

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demonstrated sufficient evidence of their ability to reduce the symptoms of ADHD and to be safeas approved by the FDA, they are generally recommended after stimulant medications are tried and fail to help (American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, (n.d). Additionally, extended release guanfacine (Intuniv) and extended release clonidine (Kapvay) are approved to be added to stimulant treatment when the stimulant doesn’t fully reduce the ADHD symptoms (American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, (n.d).Both stimulant and non-stimulant medications have side effects. Parent and teacher monitoring of positive and negative effects will increase the chances of learning about which medications are best for a child, at what dose, and whether medications should be used alone or in combination with one another (Hamed, Kauer, & Stevens, 2015).A medication’s side effects usually can be managed by reducing the dose, changing the type of medicine (immediate-acting tablet as opposed to long-acting capsule), altering the time it is administered, or switching to another medication (Hamed et al., 2015).There is a risk for stimulant medication being diverted for abuse by someone other than the patient diagnosed with ADHD, (for example to friends, other students, or even parents), other considerations include the use of non-stimulant medication or, if stimulant medication is necessary, to the long-acting or extended release forms that are less easily abused and diverted (Hamed et al., 2015).
ReferencesAmerican Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, (n.d). What is ADHD? Retrieved from spxHamed, A. M., Kauer, A. J., & Stevens, H. E. (2015). Why the Diagnosis of Attention Deficit

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