HSV1 infection of the genitals can be caused by oralgenital or genitalgenital

Hsv1 infection of the genitals can be caused by

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the mouth and lips, so­called fever blisters. HSV­1 infection of the genitals can be caused by oral­genital or genital­genital contact with a person infected with HSV­1. Genital HSV­1 outbreaks occur less regularly than genital HSV­2 outbreaks. Principal Viral STIs: Genital Herpes
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12/5/2016 Slides and Notes for 26/35 Lecture Notes Most infected people have no or minimal signs or symptoms from HSV­1 and HSV­2 infection. When signs appear, they typically occur within 2 weeks after the virus is transmitted and appear as one or more blisters on or around the genitals or rectum. After a first episode of genital herpes, about four to five more outbreaks can occur within a year. Subsequent outbreaks are less severe than the first one and the number of outbreaks decreases with time even though the infection can stay in the body indefinitely. It is diagnosed usually by visual inspection and samples from sores. It can also be diagnosed with a blood test looking for antibodies. There is no cure for herpes. Treatment includes antiviral medications and oral daily suppressive medications. Antiviral medications relieve pain, shorten the duration of sores, prevent bacterial infections at open sores, and prevent outbreaks while on the medication. HSV often responds better to oral daily suppressive therapy than topical medications. Other treatment includes rest, a balanced diet, avoiding tight clothes, keeping genital areas cool and dry, taking aspirin or other pain killers, and reducing stress. Image: McGraw Hill Principal Viral STIs: Viral Hepatitis
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12/5/2016 Slides and Notes for 27/35 Lecture Notes Hepatitis is a viral disease affecting the liver. It has three types: A, B, and C. Hepatitis A and hepatitis B can be sexually transmitted while hepatitis C is a common virus passed on primarily through contact with infected blood. We will examine hepatitis A & B since they are primarily transmitted sexually. Your text includes information on hepatitis C. There were 21,000 new infections of Hepatitis A in 2009. It is transmitted via oral contact through food or water contaminated by feces. It can also be transmitted via sexual contact, especially oral­anal sex. Although there is a vaccine, the virus can last from a few weeks to several months and does not lead to chronic infection. Vaccination is recommended for all children starting at one years old, travelers to certain countries, and other risks. There are an estimated 700,000 to 1.4 million cases of Hepatitis B. It is transmitted via sexual contact through blood, semen, saliva, vaginal secretions, and urine. It can be prevented by a simple, widely available vaccine. Symptoms range in severity from a mild illness and last a few weeks being acute to a serious long­term chronic illness that can lead to liver disease or liver cancer. The symptoms of all forms of hepatitis include fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain, jaundice, darkened urine, and an enlarged liver. Viral hepatitis is detected through a blood test.
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  • Spring '08
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