The goal of the class was to understand if clinical teaching prior to surgery

The goal of the class was to understand if clinical

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surgery. The goal of the class was to understand if clinical teaching prior to surgery would decrease patient anxiety regarding the operation and being discharged with an indwelling urinary catheter. Patient education included a multi-modal approach to foley catheter care, possible complications, and other discharge instructions. A written survey was conducted and overwhelmingly, patients reported increased confidence in caring for their catheter on discharge as well as decreased anxiety regarding surgery (Bisby, Ristau, Johnson, Streed, Bursiek, Grubbs, 2017). Collin, Bellas, Haddock, and Wagner (2015) use their article to assert the importance of preoperative patient education in the setting of robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy surgery. Curriculum for a class was developed which included all aspects of the treatment plan: pre and post-procedure, discharge, and follow up. Next, the authors summarized findings using a, “retrospective analysis”, to categorize phone calls to the unit regarding condition after discharge. They found that there was a much lower volume of “reassurance” calls from patients that
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TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH 6 attended the class compared to those that did not. Although rates of “complication” calls did not change, the authors assert that this because of the patient’s ability to more easily recognize complications due to the education provided in the class. Overall, the study found increased satisfaction between patients and providers after introducing the preoperative class (Collin et al., 2015). In the article, “Effects of urinary catheter education for patients undergoing prostatectomy”, the authors assert that a preoperative education class reduces patient anxiety and increases readiness for foley catheter care at home. A randomized control trial was conducted on patients with a localized prostate cancer diagnosis that were to undergo a radical prostatectomy operation. The participants selected were those with no experience with an indwelling urinary catheter, English speaking, could give informed consent, and those that have never attended a preoperative class before. The intervention group were provided with a preoperative class that went over post-surgical discharge instructions. A two-part survey was then conducted on patients (both from the intervention and control group) and their confidence with discharge instructions, as well as the urology nurse that provided the patient with discharge teaching. The study found that patients who attended the preoperative class overwhelmingly felt more confident with discharge instructions and were hospitalized for a shorter amount of time than those who did not (Inman, Jacobson, Maxson, Wang, Lohse, 2013). Spencer, Makic, & Shaw (2018) conducted a quality improvement study to develop a program that would reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in the outpatient setting. Their population group consisted of male urologic oncology patients who had undergone surgical intervention and were discharged home with an indwelling foley catheter. The authors found that 12.5% of the surgical patients studied were diagnosed with CAUTI. To reduce this
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  • Summer '17
  • Urology, urinary tract infection, Catheter, Urinary catheterization, Foley catheter

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