Themes Mrs Peters comes to her senses and reminds Mrs Hale that the law has got

Themes mrs peters comes to her senses and reminds mrs

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sphere. Themes Mrs. Peters comes to her senses and reminds Mrs. Hale that, “the law has got to punish crime.” Mrs. Hale cries out in response that her failure to visit Minnie and her lack of support for the isolated girl was a crime, and “who’s going to punish that?” Mrs. Hale says that she should have known Minnie needed help because all women go through “a different kind of the same thing.” Mrs. Hale says they shouldn’t tell Minnie that her canning jars of fruit broke. Despite Mrs. Peter’s emotional reflections, she still feels a responsibility to the law. Mrs. Hale, on the other hand, recognizes that the law, administered as it is by men, is inadequate to punish the many crimes associated with gender inequality. She universalizes Minnie’s story, she sees it as just an extreme version of what she and all women have experienced. Her desire to protect Minnie, marked by her decision not to tell Minnie about the broken jars, comes from this connection. Themes The women then overhear the men talking as they come down the stairs. George Henderson is saying that the murder is all perfectly clear except for a motive, a reason for killing John Wright in such a strange way. The attorney says he’ll stay at the house longer and go over everything again. Mr. Peters asks if he wants to look over what Mrs. Peters is taking to Minnie in jail, but the attorney says that she’s trustworthy because, after all, “a sheriff’s wife is married to the law.” The overheard conversation of the men reemphasizes the importance of what the women have found: the one remaining piece of evidence. Mr. Henderson’s decision to trust Mrs. Peters is an act of further belittlement: he does not think her capable of deception, and he believes her subject to the will of her husband, and therefore the law. He sees her, essentially, as belonging to her husband. But of course that is exactly the sort of thinking that ultimately led Minnie to murder her husband. Themes The men leave the room momentarily and Mrs. Peters tries to hide the box with the dead bird in her too small bag and then Mrs. Hale conceals it in her pocket. The attorney returns and jokingly acknowledges that at least they found out Minnie wasn’t going to finish her quilt by quilting it. He appeals to the ladies for the correct term for she was going to finish it. She was going to “knot it,” Mrs. Hale says, with her hand over her pocket.
Oedipus Rex Characters Oedipus: Long before the play begins, Oedipus became king of Thebes by solving the riddle of the Sphinx. His sharp mind and quickness to action have made him an admired and successful leader. When the priests come to petition him after a plague strikes the city, he has already set into motion two plans to deal with the city's crisis. Throughout the play, he makes decisions boldly and quickly, if not always wisely. In his attempts to discover the truth about the murder of Laius, he falsely accuses Creon and Tiresias of treachery, and even forces the reluctant shepherd

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