Mother Jones 18301930 Mary Harris Mother Jones was a native of Ireland who

Mother jones 18301930 mary harris mother jones was a

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Mother Jones (1830–1930)Mary Harris “Mother” Jones was a native of Ireland who immigrated to North America as a child. She became involved in the American labor movement after receiving assistance from the Knights of Labor. According to a reporter who followed “the mother of the laboring class” on her children’s march in 1903, “She fights their battles with a Mother’s Love.” Jones continued fighting until her death at age 100.Jones was definitely not the kind of woman admired by industrialists. “God almighty made women,” she declared, “and the Rockefeller gang of thieves made ladies.”BIOGRAPHYIndustrialization181
Wabash RailroadStrikeHaymarket RiotPullman StrikeAmerican Federation of LaborAmerican Railway UnionTotal Nationwide Union MembershipKnights of Labor1500130011009007005003001000Members in Thousands 1878 1880 1882 1884 1886 1888 1890 1892 1894 1896 1898 1900 1902 1904The Growth of Union Membership, 1878–1904Other organizers also achieved significant gains for women. In 1909 Pauline Newman, just 16 years old, became the first female organizer of the International Ladies’ Gar-ment Workers’ Union (ILGWU). A garment worker from the age of eight, Newman also supported the “Uprising of the 20,000.” This 1909 seamstresses’ strike won labor agree-ments and improved working conditions for some strikers.The public could no longer ignore conditions in garment factories after a fire broke out at the Triangle Shirtwaist factory in New York City on March 25, 1911. The fire spread swiftly through the oil-soaked machines and piles of cloth, engulfing the eighth, ninth, and tenth floors. As workers, mostly immigrant women, attempted to flee, they discovered that the company had locked all but one of the exit doors to prevent theft. The unlocked door was blocked by fire. The factory had no sprinkler system, and the single fire escape collapsed almost immediately. In all, 146 women died. Some were found huddled with their faces raised to a small win-dow. Public outrage flared after a jury acquitted the factory owners of manslaughter. In response, the state of New York set up a task force to study factory working conditions. During the Paterson Silk Strike of 1913, women actually gained a place among male union leadership. Encouraged by the IWW, local leaders, such as Italian immigrant Carrie Gol-zio and Jewish immigrant Hannah Silverman, held “women only” meetings for female weavers. The silk workers were demanding a halt to the new four-loom system, which required a worker to run four room-sized looms, instead of two. For nearly five months, striking Interpret Graphs

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