Page 7 organizing diversity an evolutionary tree is

This preview shows page 9 - 11 out of 68 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chemistry for Engineering Students
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 6 / Exercise 6.23
Chemistry for Engineering Students
Brown/Holme
Expert Verified
single-celled and multicellular organisms that possess a membrane-bound nucleus.Page 7Organizing DiversityAn evolutionary tree is like a family tree. Just as a family tree shows how a group of people have descended from onecouple, an evolutionary tree traces the ancestry of life on Earth to a common ancestor (Fig. 1.7). One couple can have diverse children, and likewise a population can be a common ancestor to several other groups, each adapted to a particular set of environmental conditions. In this way, over time, diverse life-forms have arisen. Evolution may be considered the unifying concept of biology, because it explains so many aspects of it, including how living organisms arose from a single ancestor.Because life is so diverse, it is helpful to group organisms into categories. Taxonomy (Gk. tasso, “arrange”; nomos, “usage”) is the discipline of identifying and grouping organisms according to certain rules. Taxonomy makes sense out of the bewildering variety of life on Earth and is meant to provide valuable insight into evolution. Systematics is the study of the evolutionary relationships between organisms.As systematists learn more about living organisms, the taxonomy often changes. DNA technology is now widely used by systematists to revise current information and to discover previously unknown relationships between organisms.Several of the basic classification categories, or taxa, going from least inclusive to most inclusive, are species, genus, family, order, class, phylum, kingdom, and domain (Table 1.1). The least inclusive category, species (L. species, “model, kind”), is defined as a group of interbreeding individuals. Each successive classification category above species contains more types of organisms than the preceding one. Species placed within one genus share many specific characteristics and are the most closely related, while species placed in the same kingdom shareonly general characteristics with one another. For example, all species in the genus Pisum look pretty much the same—that is, like pea plants—but species in the plant kingdom can be quite varied, as is evident when we compare grasses to trees. Species placed in different domains are the most distantly related.Table 1.1Levels of ClassificationCategoryHumanCornDomainEukaryaEukaryaKingdomAnimaliaPlantaePhylumChordataAnthophytaClassMammaliaMonocotyledonesOrderPrimatesCommelinalesFamilyHominidaePoaceaeGenusHomoZeaSpecies*H. sapiensZ. mays
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chemistry for Engineering Students
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 6 / Exercise 6.23
Chemistry for Engineering Students
Brown/Holme
Expert Verified
DomainsCurrent biochemical evidence suggests that there are three domains: domain Bacteriadomain Archaeaand domain Eukarya. Figure 1.7 shows how the domains are believed to be related. Both domain Bacteria and domain Archaea may have evolved from the first common ancestor soon after life began. These two domains contain the prokaryotes, which lack the membrane-bound nucleus found in the eukaryotes of domain Eukarya. However, archaea organize their DNA differently than bacteria, and their cell walls and membranes are chemically more similar 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture