Forced distribution In which a predetermined percentage of employees are placed

Forced distribution in which a predetermined

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 15 pages.

Forced distribution: In which a predetermined percentage of employees are placed  into a number of performance categories o Easier than the other two procedures o But has a drawback; have to assume that the employee performance is  normally distributed  o So they fire the bottom performing 10%  o Not always fair; For example, even though every employee at a production plant might be doing an excellent job, someone has to be at the bottom.  Thus it might appear that one worker is doing a poor job (because she is  last), when in fact she, and every other employee, is doing well.  Objective measures: - Using objective or hard criteria Quantity: - A type of objective criterion used to measure job performance by counting the number of relevant job behaviors that occur - Ex. For a salesperson’s performance by the number of units she sells - May be misleading: many factors determine the quantity of work than the  employees ability and performance; furthermore for many people’s jobs it  might not be practical or possible to measure quantity – for example computer programmers, doctors, and firefighters Quality of Work: - Measure job performance by comparing a job behaviour with a standard - Quality is measured by errors; defined by standard deviation - There has to be a standard to compare an employee’s work - Attendance: o Absenteeism, tardiness and tenure - Safety: employees who follow safety rules and who have no occupational accidents  do not cost an organization as much money as those who break rules, equipment and possibly their own bodies (wtf?) Ratings of performance: - Supervisors rate how well the employee performed on each dimension
Image of page 4
o Graphic rating scale: rating employee performance on an interval or ratio  scale; ease of construction and use; but they can experience errors as halo  and lenience o Behavioral checklists: taking task statements from a detailed job  description and converting them into behavioral performance statements  representing the level at which behavior is expected to be performed –  increases the amount of specific feedback – ex. “properly greets each  customer”, “knows customer’s names”, “thanks customers after each  transaction” Types of Rating Scales: - Normative based (comparison to other employees) o Supervisors can rate performance on a dimension by comparing the  employee’s level of performance with that of other employees o Below average, average and above average are used o This will reduce the problems of overly lenient or overly strict ratings o Ex. Comparison to other employees Much better than other tellers Better than other tellers The same as other tellers Worse than other tellers Much worse than other tellers - Frequency based o Behaviors can be rated based on the frequency with which they occur o Ex. Always, almost always, often, or never; difficult to distinguish  between almost always and often o Ex. Frequency; Refers to customer by name Always Almost always Often Seldom Never -
Image of page 5
Image of page 6

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture