Prescriptive authority and prescribing practices for advance nurse

Prescriptive authority and prescribing practices for

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Prescriptive authority and prescribing practices for advance nurse practitioners are dictated by the state in which that provider practices. Each state determines practice parameters by statutes and each practitioner is responsible for knowing those laws. The Colorado State Board of Nursing, where I currently reside and will practice, indicates , per Senate Bill 15-197 "Concerning the Prescriptive Authority of Advanced Practice Nurses" that n ew graduate APRNs are eligible for provisional prescriptive authority on entry to the SBN Advanced Practice Registry. They are eligible to apply for provisional Rx authority once they have three years of combined RN/APRN experience, successfully graduate from an accredited graduate program, pass your board certification exam, and are accepted on the SBN Advanced Practice registry. They must have 1000 hours of “Mentorship” from a physician or an experienced APRN with full prescriptive authority. . The mentor(s) should have education, training, experience, and active practice that correspond with the role (NP, CNM, and CNS) and population focus (pediatric, family, adult, gerontology, women's health) as the APRN ( Colorado Society of Advance Practice Nurses, 2015). The Process of Writing Prescriptions There are several questions to be considered before writing a prescription. These questions will help minimize medication errors and should include: “Is there a need for the drug in treating the presenting problem? Is this the best drug for the presenting problem? Are there no contraindications to this drug with this patient? Is the dosage correct? Or is
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5 it too high or too low? Does the patient have allergies or sensitivities to the drug? What drug treatment does the patient currently use, and will the potential new drug interact with the patient’s other drugs or treatments? Is there a problem with storage of the drug? Does the dosage regimen interfere with the patient’s lifestyle? Is the route of administration the most appropriate one? Is the proposed duration of treatment too short or too long? Can the patient take the prescribed drug? Has the patient been
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  • Summer '15
  • Advanced practice nurse, Advance Practice Nurse, medication error, Prescriptive Authority of Advanced Practice Nurses

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