Thomas Hardy Tess of the dUrberville Chapter 32 You are very good But it

Thomas hardy tess of the durberville chapter 32 you

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- Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 32 "You are very good. But it strikes me that there is a want of harmony between your present mood of self- sacrifice and your past mood of self-preservation." - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 35 "I agree to the conditions, Angel; because you know best what my punishment ought to be; only - only - don't make it more than I can bear!" - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 37 "She would have laid down her life for 'ee. I could do no more." - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 40 "You, and those like you, take your fill of pleasure on earth by making the life of such as me bitter and black with sorrow; and then it is a fine thing when you have had enough of that, to think of securing your pleasure in heaven by becoming converted!" - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 45 "How can I pray for you, when I am forbidden to believe that the great Power who moves the world would alter his plans on my account?" - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 46 "'You have been the cause of my backsliding,' he continued, stretching his arm towards her waist; 'you should be willing to share it, and leave that mule you call husband forever.'" - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 47 "Remember, my lady, I was your master once! I will be your master again. If you are any man's wife you are mine!" - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 47 "O why have you treated me so monstrously, Angel! I do not deserve it. I have thought it all over carefully, and I can never, never forgive you! You know that I did not intend to wrong you - why have you so wronged me? You are cruel, cruel indeed! I will try to forget you. It is all injustice I have received at your hands!" - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 51 "his original Tess had spiritually ceased to recognize the body before him as hers - allowing it to drift, like a corpse upon the current, in a direction disassociated from its living will." - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 55 "O, you have torn my life all to pieces... made me be what I prayed you in pity not to make me be again!" - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 56 "And the d'Urberville knights and dames slept on in their tombs unknowing." - Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urberville , Chapter 59
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Tess of the d’Urbervilles , novel by Thomas Hardy , first published serially in bowdlerized form in the Graphic (July—December 1891) and in its entirety in book form (three volumes) the same year. It was subtitled A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented because Hardy felt that its heroine was a virtuous victim of a rigid Victorian moral code. Now considered Hardy’s masterwork, it departed from conventional Victorian fiction in its focus on the rural lower class and in its open treatment of sexuality and religion .
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