and copying a program verbatim might instead work on your strong points more

And copying a program verbatim might instead work on

This preview shows page 328 - 331 out of 371 pages.

and copying a program verbatim might instead work on your strong points more and neglect the very weak points you’re trying to hit. Jay Nera might need more quad work, but you might need more ham work... simply copying his routine is unlikely to get you the best results. 3.) TRAINING LIKE YOU USED TO No matter how good any program is, someone will always say “man, I got pretty good results with this program, but the bench program I did in high school really shot my pressing up!” The biggest problem with this line of thinking as that as the body changes and adapts, the type of stimuli needed for progression will change as well. And because the untrained state is so conducive to rapid adaptation, of course all sorts of routines “used to work” but don’t anymore. A program heavily based in hypertrophy might not work as well as it used to once the lifter doing it nears their ideal weightclass. Even a basic strength program is left lacking when advanced athletes who need more peaking time are involved. By training the same way all the time and “training like I always have,” the intra-individual variation
Image of page 328
Chapter No. 9 Scientific Principles of Strength Training P 329 and career progression of training is not attended to and thus results cannot be expected to be great. An older program can be updated to reflect current abilities, but it’s unlikely to produce te best results verbatim with no modification. 4.) DOING AN INTERNET PROGRAM VERBATIM WITHOUT ADJUSTMENT Programs off of the internet (without a coach to adjust them for you based on needs and responses) are not without value. In fact, they can be absolutely great, especially for beginner and intermediate lifters. However, the better programs are the ones that allow plenty of room for individual variation. If a program is highly delimiting (prescribes exact exercises, sets, reps, percentages) and does not offer suggestions for alteration based on needs, it’s likely somewhat limited in its effectiveness. Any time you use an internet program, try to gravitate towards the more flexible ones, and worst-case, make some off-the-path adjustments to the non-flexible ones if needed. So long as the program you end up with after all the changes still follows the main principles of training, it should work well no matter what individual particularities you specified.
Image of page 329
Chapter No. 9 Scientific Principles of Strength Training P 330 OVER-APPLICATION OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCE 1.) POOR TECHNIQUE There is no one effective and fitting technique for all lifters of all body types and strengths. However, there are some basic rules of technical execution that hold true through every single lifting style. Here are some, mostly for an illustration and not a comprehensive list: • Keeping a lordotic lumbar spine in the squat and deadlift • Moving your hips back as well as your knees forward during the squat • Benching with your shoulder blades retracted • Not bending your elbows when you deadlift • Not letting your knees cave inwards on the squat • Etc…
Image of page 330
Image of page 331

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture