Export taxes special permission is required to export

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Export Taxes: Special permission is required to export to Mexico, both from Mexico and the United states. The problem with this is that it is nearly impossible to measure the export taxes, being that most of the vegetables and fruit are coming in and not going out of the United States. Spoiling: our company would need to establish the most efficient way to export the product, without the product spoiling, while also maintaining the longest shelf life possible. This would mean either freezing the product or canning it, though this could adversely affect the quality of the product Transportation One issue of moving our product would include the price and the time to move our product from New Mexico to Mexico. Depending on which state in Mexico we plan on transporting to, we would need to account for Gas, the price of the truck registration, and permission for entrance in Mexico. We picked the states of Mexico City, Juarez, Baja California, Acapulco, Puerto Vallarta, and Taxco. We would need both special permission to sell to these states and would also need to find the best means of transportation. Driving to Just Mexico City takes approximately 24 hours. We would need to account for the driver of the truck as well and any expenses that may come up during the drive. Such as Gas, food, and sleeping arrangements. As The possibility of acquiring more than one driver. Packaging Canning of our Chile- Slicing our product and canning it could make shipping less of a hassle, however, this would mean that our product could reach less of our desired customer base. Many restaurants in Mexico like their fruits and vegetables fresh and prefer to stay away from canned food. Unless we
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decide to sell to a fast food chain- which there are few of in Mexico, most restaurants are family owned restaurants, food stands, and high end sit down joints. Frozen- Could potentially lead to a higher shelf life, but would consist the need for trucks that have built in freezers. The problem with this would be if a truck were to break down on the way to Mexico it could lead to either spoiled products or unsatisfied customers with the expectation of a frozen product. The quality of our product could be in jeopardy. Selling Depending on where we decide to sell our product, whether a restaurant front, a farmers’ market, or even a super market could also determine the type of product we sell whether it be frozen or canned. We would need to establish a solid market, which could limit. Conclusion In conclusion, New Mexico’s Green Stuff would be a great export because it would be the first Chile to be exported to Mexico from the U.S. However, there are many problems that stand in the way of this export. Not only is an experienced exporting agent required to make it through customs, the exporting taxes are nearly impossible to figure out. Keeping a product like this fresh is nearly impossible without tainting the natural goodness of the Chile. Figuring out the best place to sell our product will determine how we package the Green Stuff.
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