2 foucault the use of pleasure ii 188 89 3 foucault

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2. Foucault, The Use of Pleasure II, 188-89. (3. Foucault, The Use of Pleasure II, 187. . 4. Foucault, The Use of Pleasure II, 188. 5. This historian suggests that we may legitimately use our own society's term and concept "bisexuality" (or, implicitly, "homosexuality" or "het- erosexuality") when we want to translate and describe for ourselves, in our terms, the emotions of individuals apart from their particular histor- ical structure, their concepts, and their language (Foucault, The Use of Pleasure II, 188). 6. The first volume of Foucault's History of Sexuality was first published in France in 1976, and the second and third volumes in 1984. 7. See Jonathan Ned Katz, 'The Age ofSodomitical Sin, 1607-1740," an essay in Gay/Lesbian Almanac: A New Documentary (NY: Harper & Row, 1983), 23-65; and documents, 66-136. Also see Michael Warner, "New English Sodom," in Jonathan Goldberg, ed., Queering the R£naissance (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1994), 330-58; Goldberg's "Sod- omy in the New World: Anthropologies Old and New," in Michael Warner, ed., Fear of a Queer Planet: Q:μeer Politics and Social Theory (Min- neapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1993), 3-18; Goldberg's, "Part Three: 'They Are All Sodomites': The New World," in his Sodometries: Renaissance Texts, Modern Sexualities (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1992), 179-249; and John D'Emilio and Estelle B. Freedman, "Part I. The Reproductive Matrix, 1600-1800," in their Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America (NY: Harper & Row, 1988), 3-54. And note the sources cited in all these tests. 8. See Lyle Koehler, A Search for Power: The "Weaker Sex" in Seventeenth- Century New England (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1980), 146-52. 9. Katz, GILA 31. 10. The term "Sodomite" was used in these colonies, but it referred di- rectly to persons from Sodom and their whole array of sins, not to a person defined essentially by the act of sodomy. My interpretation of the uses of the term "Sodomite" in these colonies differs with the anal- ysis of Michael Warner in his "New English Sodom." 11. On the making of the American middle class, for starters see: Mary P. Ryan, Cradle of the Middle Class: The Family in Oneida Cuunty, New York, 1790-1865 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1981); Karen Halttunen, Confidence Men and Painted Women: A Study of MiddW.Class Cul-
216 NOTES FROM CHAPTER 3 also indebted to the pioneering work of John Lauritsen and David Thorstad on the history of the homosexual emancipation movement in nineteenth-century Germany-see their pamphlet The Early Homosexual Rights Movement (1864-1935) (NY: Times Change Press, 1974)-and to James D. Steakley's The Homosexual Emancipation Movement in Germany (NY: Arno Press, 1975). 52. Feray and Herzer 34-35. 53. Feray and Herzer 36. 54. Feray and Herzer 25, 34-35. 55. Feray and Herzer 25, 37; and Herzer to Katz, April 16, 1989. 56. Herzer, "Kertbeny and the Nameless Love," 6, 21 n. 6. The term "heterosexual" appears in the 4th edition of R. von K.rafft-Ebing, Psycho- pathia sexualis ... (Stuttgart: Ferdinand Enke, 1889), 96, 99. "Hetero- sexual" appears four times in three different phrases: "heterosexuale Empfindung" (heterosexual sensation); "heterosexuale Gefilhle" (heterosex- ual feeling); and "heterosexualer Verkehr" (heterosexual

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