Appliqu\u00e9d cottons with ink work 9 9 Private collection Named after the

Appliquéd cottons with ink work 9 9 private

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Appliquéd cottons with ink work, 9 × 9’. Private collection Named after the scrapbooks kept by Baltimore girls, created in the nineteenth century Uses a variety of images and shapes A strong structure is imposed by a grid, forming a unified composition Balance Just as real objects have physical weight, parts of a work of art can have visual weight, or impact Balance provides a visual equilibrium and helps the work appear complete We can identify visual balance by noticing differences between two halves Symmetric Balance If a work can be cut in half and each side looks exactly (or nearly exactly) the same, then it is symmetrically balanced Examples include the human body, most animals, and a number of geometric shapes 1.6.13 Liu Ding (ritual container), China, late Shang Dynasty, c . 1600– c . 1050 BCE . Bronze. Shanghai Museum, China The t’ao t’ieh is a hidden motif found widely in the art of ancient China It is a symmetrical collection of shapes and forms that reveal a monster mask May symbolize communication with the gods Asymmetrical Balance Artists often use different visual “weights” on each side of a composition Elements on the left and right sides are not the same, but the combination counters each other 1.6.14 Muqi, Six Persimmons , Southern Song Dynasty, c . 1250. Ink on paper,14¼ × 15”. Ryoko-in, Dailoxu- ji, Kyoto, Japan
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Chinese artists have used asymmetrical balance to reflect on life and spirituality Dark, light, and the subtle differences in shape are not distributed evenly Muqi counteracts the visual “heaviness” of the right side by placing one shape lower on the left 1.6.15 Ustad Lahauri, Abd al- Karim Ma’mur Khan, Makramat Khan, commissioned by Shah Jahan, The Taj Mahal, marble architecture, Agra, India Commissioned by a grieving Shah Jahan as a memorial to his wife The pure visual symmetry unites all the elements, just as the couple felt united in their love for each other Opposite sides mirror each other, creating perfect balance 1.6.16 Plan of the tomb of Mumtaz Mahal Uses bilateral and radial symmetry All areas of the complex, including the central tomb building, can be bisected to reveal identical components on the opposite side 1.6.17 Mughal gardens and the South Gate of the Taj Mahal, Agra, India Radial balance exists in both the main building and the adjacent charbagh (Mughal garden) Each design element is repeated equidistant to a central point The multiple repetition of balance in the design is an affirmation of the depth of Shah Jahan’s love Radial Balance Radial balance (or symmetry) is achieved when all elements are equidistant from a central point and repeat in a symmetrical way from side to side and top to bottom Can imply circular and repeating elements 1.6.19 Amitayus Mandala created by the monks of Drepung Loseling Monastery, Tibet
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A mandala is a diagram of the universe Series of symbols are equidistant from the center and symmetrical The creation of a Tibetan sand painting is an act of
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