sense of self worth because approval must come from an external source A

Sense of self worth because approval must come from

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sense of self-worth because approval must come from an external source. A culturally sensitive helping professional needs to help the client (a) understand the particular dominant-subordinate political forces that have created this dilemma and (b) distinguish between positive attempts to acculturate and a negative rejection of one’s own cultural values. External Locus of Control (EC)–Internal Locus of Responsibility (IR)
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A person high in system-blame and external control feels that there is very little one can do in the face of such severe external obstacles as prejudice and discrimination. In essence, the EC response might be a manifestation of (a) having given up or (b) attempting to placate those in power. EC-ER African Americans are very likely to see the White therapist as symbolic of any other Black-White relations. The most helpful approach on the part of the therapist would be (a) to teach the clients new coping strategies, (b) to have them experience successes, and (c) to validate who and what they represent. External Locus of Control (EC)–External Locus of Responsibility (ER)
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Individuals who score high in internal control and system- focus believe that they are able to shape events in their own life if given a chance. Pride in one’s racial and cultural identity is most likely to be accepted by an IC-ER person. IC-ER orientation means that clients are likely to play a much more active part in the therapy process and to demand action from the therapist. These clients are likely to raise challenges to the therapist’s credibility and trustworthiness. Internal Locus of Control (IC)– External Locus of Responsibility (ER)
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Be able to understand and apply the concepts of ethnocentric monoculturalism to the wider society, to marginalized groups, and to how it may manifest and affect dynamics in an interracial counseling relationship. In working with diverse clients, it is important to distinguish between behaviors indicative of a true mental disorder and those that result from oppression and survival. Do not personalize the suspicions a client may have of your motives. Monitor your own reactions and question your beliefs. We are all victims of social conditioning. Implications for Clinical Practice
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Know that expertness and trustworthiness are important components of any therapeutic relationship. The therapist working with a minority client is likely to experience tests of his or her expertness and trustworthiness before serious therapy can proceed. Be aware that that clients of color or other marginalized groups may consider your professional credentials insufficient. In multicultural counseling/therapy you may be unable to use the client’s identification set (membership group similarity) to induce change. At times, racial dissimilarity may prove to be so much of a hindrance as to render therapy ineffective.
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Be aware that difficulties in multicultural counseling may not stem from race factors per se, but from the
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  • Spring '14
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