Because of how they draw frames lcds suffer from

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Because of how they draw frames, LCDs suffer from motion blur (also called ghosting) when fast movements occur on the display. While motion blur can be reduced with higher refresh rates and lower response times, it can’t be eliminated entirely. LCD screens are used in the following devices: HDTVs Computer displays Tablets Smartphones Mobile devices Wearable technology Display devices that are called LED monitors or LED TVs are simply LCDs that use LED backlighting. Plasma Plasma displays use millions of small cells that contain electrically charged ionized gases. When electrical current is applied to a plasma cell, the gas within the cell forms a plasma and emits a photon of light. Each pixel in a plasma display is made up of a red, green, and blue cell. As with OLED monitors, plasma monitors don't require a backlight. Plasma displays have several advantages: Plasma displays usually display colors more accurately than LCD displays. Because no backlighting is used, plasma displays have high contrast and can produce true black (displays that use backlighting can only display very dark grey).
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Plasma displays have almost no motion blur due to the speed of the gas reaction and the way they draw frames. Because of this, most plasma displays do not specify response times. Plasma displays have several disadvantages: Plasma displays consume two to three times as much power as LCDs. They generate much more heat than other display types. The gasses inside the cells are sensitive to air pressure fluctuations (e.g., from altitude changes). Plasma displays also suffer from a problem known as image retention (IR). Static images that are displayed for a long time cause the phosphors to overheat, which creates a temporary shadow of the image that is visible even when the display is turned off. If the static image was displayed for too long, screen burn-in can occur and the shadow image will be permanent. Plasma displays smaller than 32 inches are not sold because manufacturing them is not profitable. OLED OLED displays use a thin layer of an organic compound (called an OLED) that lights up in response to an electrical current. OLED displays are more efficient, offer a wider viewing angle, and provide faster response times (< 0.01 ms). However, they are costly to manufacture; OLEDs are the most expensive type of display device. In addition, the pixels in OLEDs (the organic compound) wears out faster than the pixels in LED or plasma displays. OLEDs can be used in any device that uses a flat-panel display. And because of their size, OLEDs can even be used in textiles (e.g., clothing and upholstery). Flexible materials can be used to create OLED screens, resulting in a bendable—sometimes even foldable—screen.
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