Furthermore looking back on Tannens previous statement now Ive realized that I

Furthermore looking back on tannens previous

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addition the author feels that agonisim can defend the academic culture from critical mediocrity. Furthermore looking back on Tannen’s previous statement now, I’ve realized that I was very agonistic coming into my English class. All of the things that Tannen mentions, I could take ownership of, because that was my mindset going into the class. More importantly, I couldn’t even recognize being what I now know as agonistic as an issue, because coming up in a personal culture atmosphere where being aggressive and inconsiderate to get a point across is the norm,
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which is why I’m in agreement with Tannen on the idea that agonism has a negative effect on academia. As I mentioned, I realized that I too was and maybe still am to a certain degree agonistic, which stirred my interest to find some examples, and here is an excerpt from one of my earlier writings in my English class when responding to a student’s discussion post, I find your post as to what I believe Dr. O’Neill was alluding to, hypocritical. With that being said, the rest of this non-argument post has no credibility. For your information, an argument is a discussion of different views, a verbal disagreement that tries to persuade the people involve on a particular opinion. So let me give you an argument. I don’t think writing rubrics are helpful at all. Who are we to say when a writer’s points are weak or strong? Some people feel that good writing is in the eye of the beholder. Writing rubrics take your personal engagement with writing, and conform it to a system of boundaries. Where’s the fun in that? As you can see, or maybe in this case hear the aggressive tone I used to respond to this student, which is a result of the conditions of my life. Even though I intentionally took that approach in that response for the sake of completing the assignment given, there was still a different way I could have communicated and gotten the same point across. For example, I could’ve embraced the student’s view on the issue, and express my willingness to understand where the student was coming from. Instead of labeling the student’s opinion, I could’ve explained how one could perceive their view and why. Mostly I could’ve taken the edge off my tone and attitude.
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The more I think about my own agonism, the deeper I feel the root of the issue is. Because in my opinion, I believe agonism isn’t some issue that just popped up, but an issue that’s been festering from many culture shifts we’ve had, like the rebellion of the 60’s which as a result conditioned people to respond to things differently. For myself, when look at that excerpt, I don’t hear a developing collegiate scholar, I hear the aggressive, dominating influence of my family loud in clear. It’s like a safety feature on a product. For instance, commercial gas kitchen grills by law have fire extinguishers installed above the grills in case of a fire. So if an intense fire happens on the grill, it triggers the extinguishers to set off, same way with me and agonism.
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  • Winter '20
  • Subject matter, Deborah Tannen, Agonism

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