1916 tank introduced as an antidote to the machine

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1916 – TANK INTRODUCED AS AN ANTIDOTE TO THE MACHINE GUN – TOO UNGAINLY AT THIS TIME TO BE EFFECTIVE HEAVY CASUALTIES. A HELLISH LANDSCAPE BOMBARDMENT WITH HEAVY ARTILLERY DESTROYED GROUND COVER AND TREES AND HEAVY RAINS COVERED THE TERRAIN WITH MUDDY CRATERS NOTIONS OF PATRIOTISM, COMRADESHIP, DUTY, AND GLORY GRADUALLY DISSOLVED
IN 1915, TEAR GAS, CHLORINE GAS, AND MUSTARD GAS USED BY BOTH SIDES RIGHT: FREDERICK VARLEY, GAS ATTACK , 1917
YPRES (1915), VIMY (April, 1917), PASSCHENDAELE (1917) – three major battles won by Canadian troops RIGHT: PASSCHENDAELE, JULY TO NOVEMBER, 1917 (Library and Archives Canada, PA- 002165 – Public Domain) IN 1917, CANADIAN TROOPS RECEIVED THEIR OWN DIVISIONS AND THEIR OWN CANADIAN COMMANDER, LT.-GEN. SIR ARTHUR CURRIE
Lord Beaverbrook ( National Archives of Canada PA 006477) Wealthy Canadian newspaper owner Lord Beaverbrook founded the Canadian War Memorials Fund in November 1916 The Fund hired more than 116 artists in Canada and Great Britain to paint over 900 scenes of Canada at war . Lieutenant General Sir Arthur Currie "I have never met anyone but who disliked the present portrait, except, of course, my enemies, who may regard it as satisfactory."— Sir Arthur Currie
CANADIAN ARTISTS TRAVELLED WITH THE CANADIAN CORPS AND RECORDED THE WAR SCENES THESE SKETCHES AND DRAWINGS WERE LATER WORKED INTO PAINTINGS, MANY OF WHICH ARE NOW IN THE CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM IN OTTAWA RIGHT: FREDERICK VARLEY, VIMY RIDGE , 1917
ALFRED BASTIEN, CANADIAN GUNNERS IN THE MUD, PASSCHENDAELE , 1917
Dressing Station in the Field — Arras , 1915 by Alfred Bastien Canadian doctors, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, author of the poem "In Flanders Fields," and Lieutenant Frederick Banting, who later co- discovered insulin with Charles Best at the University of Toronto, served overseas
The Cambrai Road, 1918 by Maurice Cullen This scene shows soldiers and vehicles moving through the French countryside You have to look closely to see the half-buried bodies in the right foreground.
War in the Air, 1918 , Painting by C. R. W. Nevinson Reconstruction of an air battle involving the Canadian flying ace W. A. (Billy) Bishop (Below) Bishop won the Victoria Cross, the British Empire’s highest award for bravery, in June 1917. By June 1918, he had been credited with the destruction of 72 enemy aircraft.
ARTHUR LISMER, RMS OLYMPIC WITH RETURNING SOLDIERS , PIER 2, HALIFAX, 1919 "The Olympic, which has carried so many of the Canadians over, docked here last week. It was a magnificent sight."— Arthur Lismer
THE HALIFAX DISASTER, 1917 : BELOW: HALIFAX HARBOUR DURING W.W.I
“Around the projection of this hill . . Another vessel suddenly appeared heading for the open sea . . . The name Imo was plainly visible beside the hawse. . . She swept across the path of the Mont Blanc. . . With a violent shock, the bow of the Imo struck the plates of the Mont Blanc and burst open. . . “ (From BAROMETER RISING, Novel by Canadian author, HUGH MACLENNAN) THE HALIFAX EXPLOSION, Dec. 6, 1917
Then a needle of flaming gas, . . . Shot through the deck of the Mont Blanc near the funnel and flashed more than two hundred feet towards the sky . . .

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