In my area of nursing we are required to ask every patient about a durable

In my area of nursing we are required to ask every

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In my area of nursing, we are required to ask every patient about a durable power of attorney or living will. We also must offer information and provide the paperwork to write the document if the patient desires one and does not have one. In labor and delivery I have had only one patient that has had a power of attorney in effect. This patient had cancer in the past and therefore had a power of attorney in effect. According to the information I have read, having a baby, getting married, or divorced, or the death of a person named in the power of attorney is a good time to reevaluate your document and make amendments if needed. Also, changes are made in laws regarding power of attorneys, so taking time to reevaluate your document can help keep the power of attorney compliant with current laws. Kantner, R. (n.d.). The New Florida Power of Attorney Law . Retrieved from - attorney&catid=1:blog&Itemid=6 The rationale for not telling a patient the whole truth would be if the physician believed that telling the patient the whole truth would cause harm to the patient. Physicians take an oath to "do no harm." If telling a patient the truth is met with the possibility of the patient doing harm to ones self, then the physician is justified in not telling the patient the whole truth. The patient should be told information the physician feels the patient can handle and also the physician should ask if the patient can have their spouse or family available to help the patient deal with the news told to them by the physician. Physicians also need to be compassionate and caring
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when informing patients of news that will not be taken well. In order for patients to make informed decisions regarding their own medical treatment, they must be informed of the diagnosis, and all possible treatment options. Legally, physicians have an obligation to fully disclose to patients all information pertaining to their state of health to allow the patient the right to be medically informed and participate in their own care. According to Edwin, 2008, "In terms of morality, deceiving patients cannot be justified under any circumstance. Lying to patients and failing to inform patients of particular risks or outcome violate the principle of autonomy and undermine the doctrine of informed consent" (para. 40). Edwin, A. (2008). Don't Lie but Don't Tell the Whole Truth: The Therapeutic Privilege - Is it Ever Justified? Ghana Medical Journal , 42 (4), 156-161. (used) One of the points to ponder in Chapter 2 is How does HIPAA change the way you view confidentiality? Before entering nursing school I never really thought about my privacy when going to the Doctor or hospital. I always assumed my private information was being protected. However, going through nursing school has completely changed my outlook on privacy. Especially as a nurse in a hospital and clinical setting, I view HIPAA in a whole new way. For example, before entering the hospital as nurse, I worked in a psychiatric outpatient clinic. There are many levels of care, which
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  • Fall '14
  • HCS 545, Health care provider, attorney, Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health

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