recommend especially as a person gets older to not work to complete failure as

Recommend especially as a person gets older to not

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 8 pages.

recommend especially as a person gets older, to not work to complete failure as “this can cause joint compression and breath holding which leads to dizziness and nausea (ACSM, n.d.).” Again, in researching this method, it is not recommended to sustain this method for the purpose of
THE ROAD TO GAINS 4 gaining muscle and strength. Its cons simply outweigh the benefits. The use of other failure methods, such as super sets, produce better results than the forced rep method. The next method to evaluate is the pyramid system. The pyramid system has been used for many years as well to produce good results in terms of strength and muscle gains. It is a method conducted by performing a single or group of exercises and working your way down to one rep or up to a certain rep. For example, I’ll use pull-ups and pushups. Much like a super set, you would work pull-ups and push-ups back-to-back or with whatever prescribed rest. I would complete one push-up then proceed to one pull-up, then complete two reps and continue on until I hit 10 complete reps of both exercises. Its simplicity makes it a go to workout for athletes. It is yet another method of meant to fatigue the muscles, but unlike forced reps, a spotter is not needed for this method. This method produces decent results due the amount of volume and intensity it allows the body to work up to. Much like super sets, because the intensity and muscle fatigue level is higher, this method allows for shorter workouts in the gym. This method is prime for gaining muscle, fat loss, and improving muscle endurance and conditioning. Lastly, I will compare and contrast periodization. According to Fahey, periodization training, or commonly referred to as cycle training, is a method that “allows the body to recover more fully and to train hard when intense training is required (Fahey, 2012).” In other words, an athlete would train a movement or muscle group harder than the other movements in the session rather than training at maximum effort for all movements in the routine. For example, I am an Olympic weightlifter. Because the sport of Olympic weightlifting is extremely central nervous system intensive, training all movements in a session can lead to overtraining and a decrease in performance if sustained for long periods of time. Take a snatch session for instance. On a typical snatch day, what is programmed are: 1) power snatch or full snatch, 2) clean pulls 3)
THE ROAD TO GAINS 5 either a back squat or a front squat 4) and maybe some presses. Snatches would be reps and sets at 75%, clean pulls would be up to 90%, squats would be at 80%, and presses are by feel for reps. In this instance, because snatches are a pulling motion as are clean pulls, they are capped at certain percentages to ensure a stimulus but to also allow the body to complete the movement. It also allows for clean training without performing the full clean. The next day would be programmed similarly: 1) clean or power clean, 2) snatch pull, 3) front or back squat, 4) a variation of a press. Cleans would be done at 75%, snatch pulls would be done at 90%, squats up to 80%, and presses by feel. Again the periodization is evident and still allows for each

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture