We live in the age of Prozac when depression is attributed to an excess or

We live in the age of prozac when depression is

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We live in the age of Prozac when depression is attributed to an excess or deficit of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. Researchers, however, believe that different types of depression correspond to the five causes of social behaviour discussed earlier in this unit.) Practice Exercise 9 My cousin takes astrology seriously. She believes that the events in her life have been predetermined by the positions of the stars and planets at the time of her birth. She won’t make a major decision without first consulting her horoscope. How would you expect this general, external self attribution to affect her behaviour? Impression Management When I was a graduate student doing my practicum at a large mental hospital, my mentor (who loved social psychology the way Glenn Gould loved the piano) sat me down for a little talk on how to handle our rivals, the psychiatrists. Lesson one was to arrive early at team meetings and sit at the head of the table. Lesson two was not to give them eye contact or acknowledge them when they spoke… and so on. I was appalled. I believed (and still do) that our adversary was mental illness rather than the psychiatric profession, but I realize now that he was tutoring me in the
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U1-16 Unit 1: Social Perception TRU Open Learning important life skill known as impression management. (The impression I was supposed to create was that the Ph.D., not the M.D., was the king of the castle.) Quite simply, impression management involves deliberately creating a powerful or positive impression of oneself on another person or persons. Early information (first impressions), distinctive information (such as unusual skills), and negative information appear to carry the most weight. Basic impression management techniques involve making oneself literally look good (as you may have done when you dressed up to apply for your first job as a dishwasher!) or making the other person look good (through ingratiation or flattery). We will return to these techniques in Units 2 and 4 when we discuss persuasion and physical attractiveness. For now, suffice it to say that impression management can be a useful and effective tool in social situations. Practice Exercise 10 How could you use impression management techniques to convince your Open Learning Faculty Member that you are a promising student worthy of a high grade? (But beware—impression management techniques that are too blatant may backfire.) Review Read: The “Summary and Review” in Chapters 1 and 3 of Social Psychology ; and Chapters 1 and 3 of the Grade Aid Workbook for Social Psychology . You have now completed your reading for Unit 1. To review, do the exercises in the Grade Aid Workbook for Social Psychology . Pay particular attention to the multiple choice and short answer/essay questions—you will encounter somewhat similar questions on the final exam. When complete the exercises, review the Unit Objectives to be sure you have achieved them. Remember, these are the objectives
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