Chapter 4 Ecosystems and Communities.pptx

Abiotic factors strong winds low precip short soggy

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ABIOTIC FACTORS: STRONG WINDS, LOW PRECIP, SHORT SOGGY SUMMERS, LONG COLD DARK WINTERS, LOW DIVERSITY Tundra
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PLANTS: GROUND HUGGING PLANTS: MOSSES, LICHEN, GRASSES Tundra
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WILDLIFE: MAMMALS AND BIRDS Tundra
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TUNDRA Geographic Distribution: North America, Asia, Europe
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TEMPS COLDER NEAR SUMMIT (TOP); WILDLIFE AND PLANT LIFE VARY BY CONTINENT Mountain Ranges Click icon to add picture
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REGIONS THAT BORDER TUNDRA; YR-RND COLD. LITTLE DIVERSITY: MOSSES, LICHEN, ALGAE, MARINE MAMMALS/ FISH; PENGUINS Polar Ice Caps
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POLAR ICE CAPS Largest source of fresh water in the world
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BELL WORK 9/26/14 Choose a biome. Give an example of the climate, one biotic feature, and one abiotic feature of that biome.
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SECTION 4: AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS Chapter 4 Ecosystems and Communities
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OBJECTIVES Identify the factors that govern aquatic ecosystems. Identify the two types of freshwater ecosystems Describe the characteristics of the marine zone.
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VOCABULARY Plankton Phytoplankton Zooplankton Wetland Estuary Detritus Salt marsh Mangrove swamp Photic zone Aphotic zone Zonation Coastal ocean Kelp forest Coral reef Benthos
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AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS
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TWO KEY FACTORS IN DETERMINING WHAT ORGANISMS CAN LIVE IN CERTAIN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS: Dissolved Oxygen (DO) Levels Water Temperature Cold water has more dissolved oxygen than warm water DO levels are related to water temperature Who needs oxygen? All the marine animals…yes, fish need oxygen too!!!
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AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS Governed by: Depth Flow Temperature Chemistry
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WHAT TYPE OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEM ARE THESE?
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FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS Flowing water Standing water
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FLOWING WATER
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STREAMS AND RIVERS Organisms are adapted to seasonal changes in water level and rate of flow Rivers change from source point to end point (where they empty out, usually ocean)
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CH-CH-CHA-CHANGES Source: usually cold (water is from springs), low in nutrients and clear shallow and narrow few phytoplankton major producers are algae on rocks in river bed Arthropods in benthic zone that feed on algae and leaves Common fish is trout Downstream from source Wider and deeper Marshes and other wetlands Warmer and murkier water Phytoplankton Frogs, catfish, insect larvae
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ORGANISMS ADAPT What sort of adaptation s do you see?
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  • Winter '17
  • Sally Micheals
  • Zoology, Work, Aquatic Ecosystem, Forest

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