10 many schools remain segregated by race as blacks and whites still mostly

10 many schools remain segregated by race as blacks

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10. many schools remain segregated by race as blacks and whites still, mostly, live in distinct neighborhoods. 11. Inequality remains. The average income of black families is still well below that of whites. Even college-educated blacks earn less than their white counterparts. 12. The civil rights movement did not achieve complete equality, but greater equality. 13. Part of the thread spins to Mae Bertha and Matthew, the thread does not break after the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. In fact, the thread is just then being woven into the lives of the hundreds of families who, like the Carters, over the next decade risked their livelihoods and lives to provide their children with a better education. 14. There are hundreds of others we never even knew. In the earlier years of school desegregation, particularly in court-ordered cases in urban areas there had been visible community support and often federal protection and widespread media coverage. For the Carters and those many other families, there were no federal troops to guard them and no reporters to tell the story of their suffering. 15. They faced mostly danger from the white community and often rejection by the black community. Abandoned by the federal government and forgotten by the American people, the children went anyway. Compare and contrast the economic political, and social adjustments in the United States in the immediate aftermath of World War I and World War II. 1. World War I triggered a number of important changes in American society: gradual and immediate. 2. Effects on Women and Minorities. At war’s end, with the return of male workers, women were expected to quit their jobs. Between 1910 and 1920, only 500,000 more women were added to the workforce. 3. The war had harsh consequences for immigrant families. Further immigration to the United States was halted. Many immigrant families already in the country faced fierce social and job discrimination in an antiforeigner climate whipped up by the war. 4. Most African American civil rights leaders supported World War I and some 400,000 African American troops served in it.
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5. Black soldiers were assigned to segregated units and often worked as laborers. Discrimination was common. Where they saw combat, African American soldiers served with distinction. Many returning black soldiers questioned why the liberties and freedoms they had fought to preserve in Europe were denied them in their own country. 6. After World War I American economy slows as war-time production ends. 7. Returning troops face difficult adjustment to civilian society. 8. Many women and minority workers faced with loss of jobs as men returned to the workforce. 9. Despite contribution to war effort, returning African American I troops continue to face discrimination and segregation. 10. Death and destruction of war leads to feelings of gloom among many Americans.
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