Fanon argues Black consciousness is immanent in its own eyes36 Baquaquas

Fanon argues black consciousness is immanent in its

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Fanon argues, “Black consciousness is immanent in its own eyes,”36 Baquaqua’s writing is a life/writing that reflects this immanent fold of black consciousness. Baquaqua’s biography opens a sacred geometry of black life that gathers Islam, Christianity, and other African faith practices into the fold of his diasporic life, producing a vertiginous subtext, a submerged textuality or invisible ink that flows through all black letters. The traces, trails, bereavements, and victories woven together in the recitations , annotations, recollected letters, and disparate tellings of Baquaqua’s auto/biography conjure the ontological complexity that Wole Soyinka describes in Myth, Literature, and the African World as the “fourth stage”: “the no man’s land of transition between . . . the ancestor’s [past], the present [of] the living, and the future of the unborn” with the invisible forces , divinities, or “orishas.”37 Together, these modes of experience form the totality of cosmic life reflected in black consciousness . This cosmic totality in the Yoruba worldview is reflective of larger patterns of African thought and belief throughout the archipelago, wherein social life consists of a dynamic cosmic environment that comprises the “total spiritual community of living and dead.”38 The immanent gesture of black writing glimpses the spiritual totality that obtains between ancestors, texts, and black writers and extends through a distribution and sharing of sacred resources among poets, philosophers, and fugitives . In this view, The Biography of Mahommah Gardo Baquaqua is a constellation of more than just a life, as it constellates a set of cartographic, poetic, and historiographical resources that have grounded and extended the fugitive passage of black letters through underground networks, railroads, and
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communities . To echo Jacques Derrida, within the communities gathered by black writing, we “[learn] to live . . . in the upkeep , the conversation, the company, or the companionship, in the commerce without commerce, of ghosts , [spirits, and ancestors]. . . . And this being-with specters would also be . . . a politics of memory, of inheritance, and of generations.” 39 Black writing emerges from this cosmic milieu as an ecological signature of a people formed from the refusal of structured limitations —a people given forth from the ocean to the geographic path, way, or movement of archipelago in a sociality beyond the ken of social life.
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A2 Gitmo The concept of “there but not” is especially consistent with Guantanamo-- Guantánamo is an exception to the presumably normal procedures that constitute the domestic. It is the spectacular terror contrasted to the normal operations of law and power within the formal boundaries of the United States Dillon 13 assistant professor of Queer Studies, holds a B.A. from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. in American Studies with a minor in Critical Feminist and Sexuality Studies from the University of Minnesota. (Stephen, “Fugitive Life: Race, Gender, and the Rise of the Neoliberal-Carceral State “,A
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